G2-3748. Monitoring the Uptake and Impact of the New US Rotavirus Vaccination Program
Session: Slide Session: Pediatric Vaccines
Tuesday, October 28, 2008: 12:00 AM
Room: Room 151B
Background: The implementation in February 2006 of routine rotavirus vaccination of US infants makes it imperative to rapidly assess vaccine uptake and impact of vaccination on the health burden of rotavirus and prevalence of circulating strains. Methods: Vaccine uptake is being assessed using data from six sentinel immunization information systems (IIS). Vaccine impact is being examined using data from national and state databases on diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency room visits and reports of rotavirus detections from a national network of sentinel laboratories. Strains are being characterized from rotavirus-positive specimens obtained from a subset of these laboratories. Results: By late 2007, >10 million doses of rotavirus vaccine had been distributed in the United States and 50%-67% of infants 3 months of age at IIS sites had received at least one vaccine dose. Coverage with full 3-dose vaccine series ranged from 27%-45% at 7 months of age and 18%-32% at 13 months of age. By March 2008, mid way through the winter 2007-spring 2008 rotavirus season, onset of rotavirus activity had been delayed by up to 2-3 months across the country. Furthermore, the vast majority of sentinel laboratories nationwide have reported declines in rotavirus detections of >60%-70% compared with data from the same months during the 7-8 years prior to vaccine implementation. More than 85% of rotavirus strains circulating during 1996-2007 contain antigens that are included in the licensed vaccines; data for 2007-2008 are awaited. Conclusions: With relatively modest levels of vaccine uptake, marked delays in onset of rotavirus activity and reductions in rotavirus detections have been reported early in the 2007-2008 rotavirus season. Monitoring is ongoing to assess disease activity through the full season and to determine whether the observed changes in disease activity can be attributed to vaccination.
Aaron Curns, MPH1, Catherine Panozzo2, Daniel Payne, PhD, MSPH2, Diana Bartlett2, Haley Clayton2, Jacqueline Tate, PhD3, Jon Gentsch, PhD1, Manish Patel, PhD4, Marc-Alain Widdowson, VetMB, MScb1, Margaret Cortese, MD1, Tara Kerin, MS5, Umesh D. Parashar, MBBS, MPH1, Warren Williams2 and  U. Parashar, None., (1)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (2)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (3)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atllanta, GA, (4)Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA, (5)Atlanta Research and Education Foundation, Atlanta, GA

Lone Simonsen
Dr Simonsen is an expert in infectious-disease epidemiology, mathematical modelling,influenza, pandemic influenza, surveillance, drug resistance, and vaccinology. Over the past 17 years she has developed methodology and analysis strategies for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health. Dr Simonsen earned her PhD in population genetics at the University of Massachusetts in 1991, then trained at the CDC in applied epidemiology and went on to work at WHO in Geneva on the epidemiology of unsafe medical injections, TB drug resistance, and global HIV/AIDS. After returning to the USA in 2000, she advised the NIAID institute leadership on influenza, SARS, and did extensive research on the epidemiology of rotavirus and intussusception, the health benefits of influenza vaccination and the epidemiology of historic pandemics. During her tenure as a senior epidemiologist at NIAID she was assigned on several occasions to assist WHO with SARS and pandemic influenza. Dr Simonsen is currently a reserach professor in the Department of Global Health at George Washington University, and the president and founder of SAGE Analytica. She has authored about 100 publications, including book chapters, peer reviewed papers, commentaries and letters.

Lauren Stockman received her Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of Vermont and her Master of Public Health from Yale University School of Epidemiology and Public Health. She has worked as an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 2003. Her interests are infectious disease epidemiology with a focus on rotavirus.

Leigh Efird, PharmD, BCPS
1998-2005-University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy-BCPS
2005-2006-Virginia Commonwealth University System -Pharm D
2006-2007-Pharmacy Internal Medicine residency at Grady Health SYstem
Manish Patel,PharmD, BCPS
1991-1995-University of Toronto, BCPS
1996-1998-Wayne State University, PharmD
1998-1999-HIV pharmacy residency at Toronto General Hospital
2000-current-Grady Health system (HIV/ID)Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Minh Ly Nguyen,MD,MPH
1986-Temple University School of Medicine,MD
1989-Lehigh Valley Hospital-Internal Medicine Residency
1991-University of Pittsburgh-Infectious Diseases fellowship
2000-Lehigh Valley Hospital-ID staff
2000-Current-Assistant Professor of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine

I am currently a fellow with the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, GA and am assigned to the Viral Gastroenteritis team within the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. I am board certified in internal medicine and pediatrics and completed medical residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL in 2008. I received my medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria, IL in 2004.

Lauren Stockman received her Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of Vermont and her Master of Public Health from Yale University School of Epidemiology and Public Health. She has worked as an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 2003. Her interests are infectious disease epidemiology with a focus on rotavirus.



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