522. Severe Influenza Pneumonia Surveillance (SIPS) Project: A Tool for the Detection of Human and Non-human strains of Influenza A in Kentucky
Session: Poster Session: Hospital-acquired and Transplant Infections
Friday, October 30, 2009: 12:00 AM
Room: Poster Hall A
Background: The threat of epidemics due to non-human strains of influenza A such as swine and avian influenza is rising. Surveillance is a critical aspect of pandemic preparedness for early case detection. Two possibilities of pandemic evolution exist. A new pandemic may begin with mild cases, during which surveillance should be concentrated on work/school absenteeism and in physician offices. The other possibility begins with severe cases, characterized by severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP), respiratory failure and ICU admission. In the event of a pandemic of sCAP, a year-round, hospital-based surveillance mechanism will be an important tool for early case detection. The objective of this study was to perform surveillance in the event of a pandemic of sCAP, we developed a surveillance mechanism in Kentucky.
Methods: Phase 1 of the study was planned in three hospitals in Jefferson County, KY, and was coordinated online. A case of sCAP was defined as a patient admitted to an ICU with the diagnosis of CAP. The Luminex xTAG respiratory viral panel multiplex PCR was used for viral identification. Statistical process control (SPC) was used to identify outbreaks. GIS was used to generate maps for spatial analysis.
Results: Surveillance for sCAP began in December 2008. The website, www.kyflu.net was developed for study coordination. From December 1, 2008 through May 11, 2009, 28 cases of sCAP were identified. The most common etiologies were S. pneumoniae and MRSA. Five different viruses were identified as causative agents of sCAP. There was no special-cause variance on the SPC chart, and there were no unusual clusters upon spatial evaluation of the maps.
Conclusion: The SIPS project successfully identified patients with sCAP of viral etiology. Surveillance for sCAP is important not only for the early detection of cases in the event of a pandemic of influenza, but for other etiologies as well.
Forest Arnold, DO, Kristina Bryant, MD2, Patricio Cabral, MD3, Raul Nakamatsu, MD2, Paula Peyrani, MD, Julio Ramirez, MD2, Carmen Sciortino, PhD2, James Snyder, PhD4, James Summersgill, PhD, Timothy Wiemken, MPH2 and  T. Wiemken,
Department of Homeland Security Role(s): Investigator, Received: Salary.
National Institute fro Hometown Security Role(s): Investigator, Received: Salary.
P. Cabral, None..
P. Peyrani, None..
F. Arnold, None..
K. Bryant, None..
R. Nakamatsu, None. 
J. Summersgill,
Department of Homeland Security Role(s): Investigator, Received: Research Support.
National Institute for Hometown Security Role(s): Investigator, Received: Research Support.
C. Sciortino, None..
J. Snyder, None. 
J. Ramirez,
Department of Homeland Security Role(s): Investigator.
National Institute for Hometown Security Role(s): Investigator., (1)University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (2)Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (3)University of Louisville Hospital