675. Genital Herpes Caused by HSV-1
Session: Abstracts: Virology
Friday, October 22, 2010
Background:

Genital disease caused by HSV-1 and HSV-2 have different clinical presentation and prognostic features. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of cases of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 and identify the main clinical and epidemiological characteristics in a busy, public STD clinic.

Methods:

We performed a retrospective chart review of individuals with culture and/ or type-specific HSV serology collected during the year of 2007 at the Downtown STD clinic of the Miami-Dade County Health Department. Demographics and clinical information were included in the analysis. Primary genital herpes caused by HSV-1 was defined by a positive culture for HSV-1 and a negative serological test. Recurrent genital HSV-1 was defined by a positive culture and a positive serological test for HSV-1.

Results:

A total of 663 individuals were tested for HSV infection in the study period. 418 (63%) were males and 245 (37%) females. In this sample, the prevalence for HSV-1 was 42.1% and HSV-2 was 36.7%. Cultures were obtained in 325 individuals and were positive in 94 cases. Most of the cultures were positive for HSV-2 (84%) nonetheless 16% were positive for HSV-1. All HSV-2 positive cultures were from the anogenital areas. Out of the 15 individuals with a HSV-1 positive culture, eleven were from genital ulcers and 4 from the oral mucosa. Among those eleven individuals with positive genital HSV-1 cultures 5 were women and 6 men, the majority were heterosexuals (9/11) and they were all HIV-negative. Less than half of them (5/11) complained of symptoms related to the ulcers, but all of them had ulcers during the examination. Nine of them did not have HSV- specific serology performed, one had a negative test and one had a positive test.

Conclusion:

HSV-1 is not an uncommon cause of genital herpes in patients presenting with genital ulcers in this STD clinic.


Subject Category: C. Clinical studies of bacterial infections and antibacterials including sexually transmitted diseases and mycobacterial infections (surveys, epidemiology, and clinical trials)

Speakers:
Jose Castro, MD , Infectious Diseases, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Maya Morrison-Bryant, M.D. , Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL
Maria Alcaide, MD , Infectious Diseases, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Isabella Rosa-cunha, M.D. , University of Miami, Miami, FL

Disclosures:

J. Castro, None

M. Morrison-Bryant, None

M. Alcaide, None

I. Rosa-cunha, None

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