1359. Managing the Diabetic Foot: Old Enemy, New Weapons
Session: Symposium: Close to the Bone: Recent Advances in Hard Tissue Infection
Saturday, October 22, 2011: 5:45 PM
Room: 210ABC
About a quarter of diabetic patients who present with a foot infection have underlying osteomyelitis. Diagnosing this bone infection is complicated by several factors, especially the potential presence of neuro-osteoarthrpathy, and defining the causative pathogen often requires a culture of bone. Newer clinical tests and imaging studies have been developed. Treatment of osteomyelitis is usually multi-modal, but the type and duration of antimicrobial therapy, need for surgery, and tests of cure are all controversial issues. This lecture will review recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot osteomyelitis.


Benjamin A. Lipsky, MD, FIDSA, Department of Medicine & VA General Medicine Service, VA Puget Sound & University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Benjamin A. Lipsky received his medical training at the Cornell University Medical College in New York City, completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine program, where he served as a chief medical resident in 1976. He undertook his infectious diseases fellowship at the University of Washington affiliated hospitals, became board-certified, and was later elected a Fellow in the American College of Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Royal College of Physicians (London). Dr. Lipsky joined the faculty of the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington in 1978, rising to the rank of Full Professor in the Physician-Scientist track. Throughout his career he has been based at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System in Seattle, where he has been the head of the Infection Control Program and Medical Center Epidemiologist, and is currently Director of the Primary Care Clinic. Dr. Lipsky has also been Director of the Seattle Antibiotic Research Clinic, where he has conducted numerous studies of the diagnosis and treatment of various bacterial infections. He has authored over 200 scientific publications, reviews and book chapters on a variety of topics, with an emphasis on urinary tract infections in men, soft tissue and bone infectinos and foot infections in diabetic patients. He has co-authored three textbooks and two nationally broadcast television programs on antibiotic therapy, and chairs the guidelines committees on diabetic foot infection of both the IDSA and International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot. Dr. Lipsky has twice spent a year as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Among several honors he is the recipient of the 2008 “Edward James Olmos Award for Advocacy in Amputation Prevention,” which is “given annually to the clinician/scientist with the greatest impact on the diabetic foot worldwide



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