52. West Nile Virus Infection: CNS Pathogenesis and Host Immune Response
Session: Symposium: Pathogenesis of Central Nervous System Infection
Thursday, October 20, 2011: 1:00 PM
Room: 253ABC


Michael Diamond, MD, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, St. Louis, WA

NAME
Michael S. Diamond
POSITION TITLE
Associate Professor
INSTITUTION AND LOCATION
DEGREE
(if applicable)
YEAR(s)
FIELD OF STUDY
Columbia University, New York, NY
Columbia University, New York, NY
Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
Harvard University, Boston MA
University of California, San Francisco
University of California, Berkeley
BA
ResScholar
MD
PhD
9/81-5/85
5/85-8/86
9/86-6/94
7/88-10/92
7/97-6/01
7/98-6/01
Political Science
Anatomy
Medicine
Cell & DevelopBiology
Medicine & Infect Dis
Schl Public Health
Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
MD
9/86-6/94
Medicine
Harvard University, Boston MA
PhD
7/88-10/92
Cell & DevelopBiology
PHS 398/2590 (Rev. 09/04, Reissued 4/2006)
Page
Biographical Sketch Format Page
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
7/06 -
Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, Medicine, Molecular Microbiology,
Pathology & Immunology, Associate Professor with tenure
HONORS AND AWARDS
1984, 1985 Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude, Columbia College of Columbia University
1986-1994
NIH-Medical Scientist Training Program Grant Recipient
1990-1992
Harvard Graduate School of Arts &Sciences Ryan Fellowship
1994-1995
Cancer Research Institute Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
1998-2000
Bank of America Giannini Foundation Post Doctoral Fellowship
1999-2001
Infectious Disease Society Postdoctoral Fellowship
2002
Edward Mallinckrodt Jr. Development Award
2002
Eliison Foundation New Scholar in Global Infectious Diseases
2007
American Society of Clinical Investigation, induction as member
2007
Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research
REFERENCES (partial listing of 75 peer reviewed research articles)
48. Nybakken, GE, Chen, B, Nelson, C, Diamond, MS, and Fremont, DH. Crystal structure of West Nile virus envelope protein. 2006. J.Virol. 80:11467-11474.
49. Keller, BC, Fredericksen, BL, Samuel, MA, Mock, RE, Mason, PW, Diamond, MS, and Gale, M. Resistance to type I interferon defines replication fitness and virulence of West Nile virus. 2006. J. Virol. 80:9424-9434.
50. Mehlhop, E and Diamond, MS. Protective immune responses against West Nile virus are primed by distinct complement activation pathways. 2006. J Exp Med. 203:1371-1381..
51. Samuel, M, Whitby, K, Marri, A, Barchet, W, Williams, BRG, Silberman RH, Gale, M, and Diamond, MS. Protein kinase R and RNAse L contribute to protection against lethal Wesst Nile virus infection by controlling early spread in the periphery and viral replication in neurons. 2006. J Virol. 80:7009-7019..
52. Shrestha, B, Wang, T, Whitby, K, Craft, J, Fikrig, E, and Diamond, MS. Interferon γ plays a crucial early antiviral role in the protection against West Nile virus infection. 2006. J Virol.. 80:5338-5348.
53. Diamond, MS and Klein, R. A genetic basis of human susceptibility to West Nile Virus. 2006.Trends in Microbiology. 14:287-289.
54. Morrey, JD, Siddharthan, V, Olsen, AL, Roper GY, Wang, H, Baldwin, TJ, Koenig, S, Johnson, S, Nordstrom, JL and Diamond, MS. Humanized monoclonal antibody against West Nile virus E protein administered after neuronal infection protects against lethal encephalitis in hamsters. 2006. J. Inf. Dis. 194:1300-1308.
55. Kaufmann, B, Nybakken, GE, Chipman, PR, Zhang, W, Fremont DH, Diamond, MS, Kuhn, RJ, and Rossmann, MG. West Nile virus in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. 2006. PNAS, 103:12400-12404.
56. Gitlin, L, Barchet, W, Gilfillan, Cella, M, Beutler, B, Flavell, R



Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 20 with the exception of research findings presented at IDSA press conferences.