326. Immunization and Bellís Palsy among Children: A Case-Centered Analysis
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Challenges in Vaccinology and Vaccine Exploration
Friday, October 21, 2011
Room: Poster Hall B1
Background: Bell’s palsy is an acute, idiopathic, and usually unilateral paralysis of the seventh cranial (i.e., facial) nerve. Speculation regarding an association between immunization and Bell’s palsy exists; however, rigorous population-based epidemiologic studies to evaluate such an association among children are lacking.

Methods: This study was conducted within the population of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. From January 2001 through December 2006, all children 18 years of age and younger diagnosed with Bell’s palsy were identified using the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision (ICD-9) code 351.0. All Bell’s palsy cases were reviewed and adjudicated as definite, probable, or rejected by an otolaryngologist using detailed chart review data. Using a novel case-centered logistic regression model, we evaluated the association between immunization and Bell’s palsy during the 1-28 days and 29-56 days following immunization among cases who had received trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV), hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine, or any vaccine within one year prior to the onset of Bell’s palsy symptoms. 

Results: We identified a total of 822 definite and probable cases of whom 233 had received a vaccine within the previous year. Mean age of the study population was 10.3 years; 61% of the study population was female and 43% was White. Immunization with TIV (odds ratio [OR] = 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 2.8), HepB vaccine (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.2, 2.4), or any vaccine (OR = 0.9; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.4) was not significantly associated with an increased risk of Bell’s palsy during the 1-28 days following immunization. Similarly, no significant association was found for immunization with TIV (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.3, 4.8), HepB vaccine (OR = 0.9; 95% CI: 0.3, 2.6), or any vaccine (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.1) and Bell’s palsy during the 29-56 days following immunization.

Conclusion: In this large population-based epidemiologic study, we found no association between Bell’s palsy and immunization in children.


Subject Category: I. Adult and Pediatric Vaccines

Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, MD, MPH, PhD1, Ned Lewis, MPH1, Paula Ray, MPH1, Nicola Klein, MD, PhD1, Barry Rasgon, MD2, Steven Black, MD3, Jerome Klein, MD4 and Roger Baxter, MD1, (1)Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, CA, (2)Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland , CA, (3)Global Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, (4)Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA

Disclosures:

A. Rowhani-Rahbar, None

N. Lewis, None

P. Ray, None

N. Klein, Sanofi Pasteur: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Merck & Co.: Grant Investigator, Research grant
GSK: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Novartis: Grant Investigator, Research grant
MedImmune: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Pfizer: Grant Investigator, Research grant

B. Rasgon, None

S. Black, Novartis : Consultant, Consulting fee

J. Klein, None

R. Baxter, Sanofi Pasteur: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Merck & Co.: Grant Investigator, Research grant
GSK: Grant Investigator, Research grant
MedImmune: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Novartis: Grant Investigator, Research grant
Pfizer: Grant Investigator, Research grant

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 20 with the exception of research findings presented at IDSA press conferences.