1010. Comparison of the Ibis System Versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for the Detection of Organisms Colonizing Healthcare Personnel
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Detecting, Identifying, and Typing Bacteria
Saturday, October 22, 2011
Room: Poster Hall B1
Background: The understanding of transmission of nosocomial pathogens can be limited by the sensitivity of culture. Novel molecular platforms are available, including the Ibis system, to screen for pathogen colonization.

Methods: Hands of 10 healthcare personnel were screened prior to providing care to severe burn patients; gown, gloves and hands after care. Swabs were assessed for bacteria using traditional clinical microbiology (TM) and the Ibis T5000TM Biosensor system.

Results:  Hands prior to patient care revealed 4 bacteria on 4 personnel by TM and 39 organisms on all 10 subjects by Ibis.  Gloves were colonized in 6 personnel (13 isolates) using TM; all 10 (31 bacteria) by Ibis. 5 subjects (6 isolates) had bacteria found on the gown using TM and 9 (28 bacteria) by Ibis. For the post-care hand samples, 6 subjects (6 isolates) were colonized as detected by TM and 10 (38 bacteria) by Ibis. Positive correlation between TM and Ibis by site occurred in 16 (40%) samples (CNS (10), MRSA (4) and P. acnes (3, if GPR were P. acnes)).

 

TM

Ibis

Select bacteria

Hand-pre

Glove

Gown

Hand-post

Hand-pre

Glove

Gown

Hand-post

CNS

4

4

3

3

12

6

8

12

Streptococci

 

1

 

 

9

4

3

1

S. aureus

 

2

 

1

 

3

3

1

E. aerogenes

 

2

 

 

 

1

 

 

Acinetobacter spp

 

1

 

 

 

3

1

 

S. marcescens

 

 

 

 

2

1

 

1

K. pneumoniae

 

 

 

 

1

3

1

1

E. coli

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

B. fragilis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Conclusion: The Ibis system was able to detect more pathogens including potentially virulent and more resistant pathogens, than TM. This may serve as a useful adjunct in outbreak investigations and control of endemic nosocomial pathogens.


Subject Category: N. Hospital-acquired and surgical infections, infection control, and health outcomes including general public health and health services research

Heather Yun, MD1, Helen Crouch, RN, MPH, CIC1, Bernadette Thompson, RN, BSN, CIC1, Myra Castillo, RN, BS, CIC2, Kevin K. Chung, MD2, Joseph Wenke, PhD2, Joseph Hsu, MD2, Garth Ehrlich, PhD3, Rachel Kreft, RN, BS3, J. William Costerton, PhD3, Katrin Mende, PhD4, Charles Guymon, MA2, Duane Hospenthal, MD, PhD5 and Clinton K. Murray, MD1, (1)San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, (2)US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX, (3)Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, (4)Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, (5)San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCHE MDI 7 East, TX

Disclosures:

H. Yun, None

H. Crouch, None

B. Thompson, None

M. Castillo, None

K. K. Chung, None

J. Wenke, None

J. Hsu, None

G. Ehrlich, None

R. Kreft, None

J. W. Costerton, None

K. Mende, None

C. Guymon, None

D. Hospenthal, None

C. K. Murray, None

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 20 with the exception of research findings presented at IDSA press conferences.