1042. Subspecialty training in infectious diseases: How hot is our field?
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Education and Training in Infectious Diseases
Saturday, October 22, 2011
Room: Poster Hall B1
Background: It has been postulated that the interest to pursue subspecialty training in infectious diseases (ID) have decreased in recent years. If true, this observation could have a significant impact on the field and could create a shortage of ID specialists in the future. This information could also be important for institutions training ID doctors. The goal of this study was to determine if there has been a significant change in recent years, related to training in infectious diseases in the United States. Methods: This study included data from all programs and all applicants that applied to an ID fellowship through the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) between 2006 and 2010. Data collected for every year included: Total number of applicants, number of programs offering ID training, number of positions offered, total number of filled/unfilled positions, and number of applicants per position. Statistical significance was determined using Chi-Square. All Data was collected from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reports. Results:  29 new positions were offered in 2010 as compared to 2006. There was a parallel increase in the total number of unfilled positions (Table 1), but the percentage remained similar and the trend was not statistically significant by Chi-Square (p=0.68). There were no significant differences on number of applicants per position. Conclusion: The interest in pursuing fellowship training in ID as measured by filled and unfilled positions appear similar to previous years. More studies are necessary to characterize the factors that influence the decision to pursue ID training in the United States.

Table 1. Offered and filled/unfilled positions in ID fellowships from 2006 to 2010

Year

Positions Offered

Positions

Filled

Positions

Unfilled

% Positions

Filled

% Positions Unfilled

2010

300

267

33

89

11

2009

303

267

36

88

12

2008

283

256

27

90

10

2007

275

254

21

92

8

2006

271

236

35

87

13


Subject Category: J. Clinical practice issues

Victor Herrera, MD, Departments of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA

Disclosures:

V. Herrera, None

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 20 with the exception of research findings presented at IDSA press conferences.