985. Bacterial Vaginosis among African American Women Who Have Sex with Women in Jackson, Mississippi
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Clinical Studies of Bacterial Infection
Saturday, October 22, 2011
Room: Poster Hall B1
Background: The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women who have sex with women (WSW) is high. Risk factors for prevalent BV among WSW are not completely understood, especially in racial minority populations of WSW such as African American WSW (AAWSW), and there is debate about whether BV can be sexually transmitted between women. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for prevalent BV among a cohort of AAWSW.

Methods: AAWSW presenting to an STD Clinic in Jackson, MS between February 2009 and October 2010 and reporting a history of sex with another woman during the past 12 months were invited to participate. A survey on socio-demographics, genital hygiene practices, sexual history, and sexual risk behavior characteristics was completed followed by a genitourinary examination with routine STI testing. Clinical diagnosis of BV was made using 3 of 4 of Amsel’s criteria.

Results: 196 AAWSW were enrolled. Mean age was 24.5 ± 5.0. Clinical diagnosis of BV by Amsel’s criteria was made in 93/196 (47.4%) of all women. Risk factors that were associated with BV in univariate analysis included douching within the past 30 days (p = 0.02), age > 18 years old at first sex with a female sexual partner (p = 0.02), and number of lifetime female sexual partners (p = 0.02). These risk factors remained significant in multivariable analysis. Lifetime history of sex with men, number of female sexual partners within the past 12 months, and tobacco use in the past 30 days were not significant in this analysis.

Conclusion: BV was common among this cohort of AAWSW and independently associated with douching, age > 18 at first sex with a female partner, and number of lifetime female sexual partners. Data supporting sexual transmission of BV between women continues to be elusive and further research is necessary.  


Subject Category: C. Clinical studies of bacterial infections and antibacterials including sexually transmitted diseases and mycobacterial infections (surveys, epidemiology, and clinical trials)

Christina Muzny, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, Imran Sunesara, MBBS, MPH, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, Jane Schwebke, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL and Leandro Mena, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS

Disclosures:

C. Muzny, None

I. Sunesara, None

J. Schwebke, None

L. Mena, None

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 20 with the exception of research findings presented at IDSA press conferences.