1655. Physicians’ Confidence in Vaccine Safety Studies
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Programmatic Adjustments to Improve Vaccine Coverage
Saturday, October 20, 2012
Room: SDCC Poster Hall F-H
Background: The US has an elaborate system for assessing vaccine safety.  Pediatricians (Peds) and family physicians (FM) deliver most vaccines to children in the US.  Their level of confidence in vaccine safety studies has not been well studied. Our objectives were to ascertain through two separate surveys among nationally representative networks of Peds and FM: 1) physicians’ reported level of confidence in pre- and post-licensure vaccine safety studies; and 2) changes in reported level of confidence from 2007 to 2010/11.

Methods: Two surveys were conducted August to October 2007 and November 2010 to January 2011 using distinct physician survey networks designed to be representative of the American Academy of Family Physicians and American Academy of Pediatrics memberships. These networks are similar to physicians randomly sampled from the American Medical Association master fıle with respect to demographics and vaccine-related attitudes. The surveys assessed physicians’ confidence in pre- and post-licensure vaccine safety studies using 4-point Likert scales. The surveys were pretested by physician advisory boards and pilot tested in national samples of primary care physicians.

Results: The survey response rates were 81% (FM, 79%; Peds, 84%) for the 2007 survey (691/848) and 66% (FM, 61%; Peds, 70%) for the 2010/11 survey (532/811).  For FM, 35% in 2007 and 31% in 2010/11 reported little or no confidence in pre-licensure vaccine safety studies (p=0.40). While for Peds, 8% in 2007 and 11% in 2010/11 reported little or no confidence (p=0.32, p<0.001 for comparison between specialties). Compared to pre-licensure studies, higher percentages of physicians reported a great deal of confidence in post-licensure vaccine safety studies, and physicians’ confidence increased from 2007 to 2010/11 (FM, 20% in 2007 vs 30% in 2011, p=0.01; Peds, 45% in 2007 vs 59% in 2010/11, p<0.001; p<0.001 for comparison between specialties).

Conclusion: Some physicians’ lack of confidence in vaccine safety studies is likely to contribute to concerns about vaccine safety among the general public.  Family physicians’ report of little or no confidence in pre-licensure vaccine safety studies may in part explain why they generally adopt new vaccines more slowly than pediatricians.

Sean O'Leary, MD, MPH1, Mandy Allison, MD, MSPH2, Shannon Stokley, MPH3, Lori Crane, PhD, MPH4, Laura Hurley, MD, MPH5, Brenda Beaty, MSPH6 and Allison Kempe, MD, MPH1, (1)Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, (2)Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (3)National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (4)Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, (5)Denver Health, Denver, CO, (6)Colorado Health Outcomes Research, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO

Disclosures:

S. O'Leary, None

M. Allison, None

S. Stokley, None

L. Crane, None

L. Hurley, None

B. Beaty, None

A. Kempe, None

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