1284. Risk factors for development of bloodstream infections caused by Bacillus species among adult patients with cancer
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Bacteremia and Endocarditis
Saturday, October 5, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Background: Bacillus species, which were previously considered as possible contaminants, have been frequently reported as true pathogens among cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy in recent decades. However, there have been limited data about clinical characteristics of cancer patients developing bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by Bacillus spp. The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical features and risk factors of BSI caused by Bacillus spp. among adult patients with cancer.

Methods: A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors of BSI caused by Bacillus spp. among adult patients with cancer. The electronic medical records were reviewed in individuals who were diagnosed with BSI caused by Bacillus spp. during the period of January 1995 through December 2012 at a tertiary care university hospital. Each case of BSI caused by Bacillus spp. was matched to two controls with BSI by other pathogens in cancer patients.

Results: A total of 86 patients with BSI caused by Bacillus spp. were included and compared with 172 control patients with BSI by other pathogens. Factors associated with development of BSI caused by Bacillus spp. were hospital stay less than 15 days, presence of central venous catheter, underlying hematologic malignancy, diarrhea at the first day of bacteremia, and previous use of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (all P < 0.05). Conversely, history of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the previous use of glycopeptides had a negative association with BSI caused by Bacillus spp. (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, all of factors mentioned above were statistically significant, except hematologic malignancy and diarrhea.

Conclusion: In adult patients with cancer, Bacillus spp. were significant causes of BSI, in association with underlying hematologic malignancy, hospital stay less than 15 days, presence of central venous catheter, and previous use of extended-spectrum cephalosporin.

Jaehoon Ko, MD1, Kyungmin Huh2, Cheol-In Kang, MD2, Doo Ryeon Chung3, Namyong Lee3, Kyong Ran Peck3 and Jae-Hoon Song, MD2, (1)Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (2)Division of Infectious Diseases, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (3)Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

Disclosures:

J. Ko, None

K. Huh, None

C. I. Kang, None

D. R. Chung, None

N. Lee, None

K. R. Peck, None

J. H. Song, None

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