431. The Impact of Universal Chlamydia Trachomatis Screening during Pregnancy on Pediatric Seroprevalence: 1991-2011
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Pediatric Infections
Thursday, October 3, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Posters
  • Slide1.jpg (147.5 kB)
  • Title: The Impact of Universal Chlamydia Trachomatis Screening during Pregnancy on Pediatric Seroprevalence: 1991-2011

    Background:  There are no current epidemiologic studies of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection in children since the implementation of universal screening and treatment of pregnant women in the United States, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1993.

    Methods:  Anonymized banked serum samples from children in Brooklyn, New York, were used to determine IgG antibodies to CT using microimmunofluorescence (MIF) assay. Serum samples were divided into 2 groups: group 1 was collected from 1991-1995 and group 2 from 2001-2011.

    Results:  197 serum samples were identified. The age-specific prevalence of IgG antibodies for both groups is shown in Table 1 below. A higher number of subjects younger than 10 years of age in group 1 (pre-universal screening) had IgG against CT in comparison to group 2 (post- universal screening).  In general, the overall prevalence of IgG antibodies decreased post-universal screening (p=0.0276).

    Age Specific Prevalence of Anti-CT IgG

     

    Age <10

    Age ≥10

    Group 1 (pre-screen)

    30%

    31%

    Group 2 (post-screen)

    11%

    17%

    Conclusion:  The pre-universal screening group (group 1) had relatively high rates of seropositivity in young children which were likely due to high rates of perinatal infection as reported previously during the 1980’s. The post-universal screening group (group 2) had decreased seropositivity and this may reflect the effect of universal screening and treatment of pregnant women thereby decreasing perinatal infection.

    Natalie Banniettis, MD1, Stephan Kohlhoff, MD2, Margaret Hammerschlag, MD2, Kobkul Chotikanatis, M.D.3 and Rauno Joks, MD2, (1)Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, (2)SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, (3)Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn , NY

    Disclosures:

    N. Banniettis, None

    S. Kohlhoff, None

    M. Hammerschlag, None

    K. Chotikanatis, None

    R. Joks, None

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