164. Ceftaroline Activity Tested against Bacterial Isolates from Pediatric Patients: Results from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance and Evaluation (AWARE) Program for the United States (2011-2012)
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Antimicrobial Use in Children
Thursday, October 3, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Posters
  • IDWEEK 2013 Ceftaroline PEDS 164.pdf (132.4 kB)
  • Background: Ceftaroline (CPT), the active form of CPT fosamil, is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against resistant (R) gram-positive (GP) organisms, including methicillin-R S. aureus (MRSA), and many Enterobacteriaceae species. CPT fosamil is FDA-approved for treatment of acute bacterial skin/skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults.

    Methods: 5291 consecutive unique pediatric patient strains of clinical significance were collected from 157 USA medical centers as part of the AWARE Program. The isolates were identified locally and forwarded to a central monitoring laboratory (JMI Laboratories) for reference antimicrobial susceptibility (S) testing. S results were analyzed according to patient age as follows: ≤1 years old (yo; 1857 strains); 2-5 (1342); 6-12 (1281) and 13-17 (811).

    Results: MRSA rates were slightly lower in isolates from patients 13-17 yo (39.9%) compared to other age groups, and CPT was consistently active against S. aureus (SA) isolates from all four age groups (MIC50/90, 0.25/1 g/mL; 99.8-100.0% S). 99.8% of MRSA were CPT-S (MIC50/90, 0.5/1 g/mL). R rates to erythromycin, clindamycin and levofloxacin among SA did not vary significantly among age groups. All S. pneumoniae (SPN) strains (1178) were CPT-S (MIC50/90, ≤0.015/0.12 g/mL), while ceftriaxone S varied from 84.8 (≤1 yo) to 89.7% (13-17 yo). The highest CPT MIC among H. influenzae (HI; 587 strains) was 0.12 g/mL (100.0% S), and β-lactamase production rates varied from 24.2 (13-17 yo) to 30.1% (6-12 yo); 27.9% overall. CPT was also very active against β-hemolytic streptococci (BHS; 556 strains, highest MIC 0.06 g/mL). ESBL-phenotype rates among E. coli (EC)/Klebsiella spp. (KSP) were 6.0/5.1, 11.0/11.5, 5.1/8.3 and 11.4/14.7% for the ≤1, 2-5, 6-12 and 13-17 age groups, respectively. CPT exhibited good activity against non-ESBL-phenotype strains of EC and KSP (MIC90, 0.25 g/mL for both organisms), but limited activity against ESBL-producing strains.

    Conclusion : CPT demonstrated potent in vitro activity against SA, SPN, BHS and HI isolated from pediatric patients, independent of patient age. Differences in S rates to comparator agents according to patient age group were observed mainly among EC and KSP.

    Helio Sader1, Robert Flamm1 and Ronald Jones, MD2, (1)Jmi Laboratories Inc, North Liberty, IA, (2)JMI Laboratories Inc, North Liberty, IA

    Disclosures:

    H. Sader, Cerexa Inc.: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient
    Forest Laboratories: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient

    R. Flamm, Cerexa Inc: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient
    Forest Laboratories: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient

    R. Jones, Cerexa Inc: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient
    Forest Laboratories: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient

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