1571. EFFECTS OF LEVELS OF MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN POLYMORPHISMS TO THE RESPONSE OF TREATMENT IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C INFECTION
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Microbial and Host Genetic Factors in Disease
Saturday, October 5, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Posters
  • tez poster3.pdf (63.9 kB)
  • Background:

    The natural history and outcome of HCV infection are usually associated with the interaction of virus and the host immune response. Mannose binding lectin is a key factor of the immune response to infections. Individuals who have certain genotypes of mannose binding lectin are known to be more prone severe and prolonged infectious diseases. A role for mannose binding lectin in hepatitis C virus infection had been indicated by few previous studies examining mannose binding lectin levels and polymorphisms in relation to disease progression and response to treatment. This study aims to investigate the correlation of response to treatment for chronic hepatitis C with serum concentration of mannose binding lectin and polymorphisms of mannose binding lectin gene.

    Methods:  In this study, serum mannose binding lectin concentration was measured by ELISA and codon 54 mutation of mannose binding lectin gene was searched with PCR-RFLP method both in chronic hepatitis C patients and control group. Fifty hepatitis C infected patients treated with combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin and 75 healthy controls were included into study.

    Results:  Codon 54 mutation was found to be increased in chronic hepatitis C patients compared to control subjects but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was statistically significant decrease in serum mannose binding lectin concentration in subjects with codon 54 gene mutation. Relatively higher decrease in mannose binding lectin concentration in chronic hepatitis C patients compared to control group was not statistically significant. Also mutation frequencies and mannose binding lectin serum concentration were similar between responders and non-responders.

    Conclusion: Low mannose binding lectin levels does not increase susceptibility to hepatitis C infection, and mannose binding concentrations does not have a major influence on the course of the disease and response to antiviral therapy but a larger sample size is necessary to confirm the present results.

    Suheyla Komur1, Ayse Seza Inal2, Behice Kurtaran2, Aslihan Candevir Ulu2, Yesim Tasova2 and Hasan Salih Zeki Aksu2, (1)Cukurova University, adana, Turkey, (2)Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey

    Disclosures:

    S. Komur, None

    A. S. Inal, None

    B. Kurtaran, None

    A. Candevir Ulu, None

    Y. Tasova, None

    H. S. Z. Aksu, None

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