1511. Declining rates of HIV-TB co-infection in British Columbia and the efficacy of current Canadian tuberculosis screening practices in the HAART era
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HIV and Co-infections
Saturday, October 5, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Posters
  • HIV & TB - IDSA.pdf (687.2 kB)
  • Background: The incidence and clinical manifestations of HIV-Tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection in the era of widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART) is largely unknown.  The effects of latent TB screening and treatment are also unclear. We performed a retrospective study to examine incidence and clinical manifestations of tuberculosis in the HIV infected population of British Columbia (BC). We examined tuberculosis screening and treatment in HIV-TB co-infected patients to understand their effects in a region with high rates of ART coverage. 

    Methods: We performed a retrospective study on all HIV-TB co-infected individuals in BC between Jan 1, 2003 and Dec 31, 2012. Demographic and clinical characteristics were extracted, along with screening and treatment outcomes.  At a population level, HIV and
    ART prevalence was also examined. 

    Results: 126 cases positive for both active TB and HIV (incidence of 124 per 100,000 HIV infected population) with a median age of 43.3 years. 63 individuals (50.0%) had one previously documented screening TST. Of the 39 individuals with a prior positive TST, 38 (97.4%) did not complete preventative therapy for LTBI. Of the 24 TST negative individuals, 20 (83.3%) did not have repeated testing within 12 months of developing active TB.  TB-HIV co-infection rates have decreased significantly over the past 10 years (p-value < 0.01).

    Conclusion: This study of a provincial TB screening program reveals that HIV-TB co-infection rates decreased significantly over the past 10 years despite suboptimal screening and treatment practices. Consideration should be given to intensifying screening efforts and LTBI treatment to accelerate HIV-TB elimination in low incidence regions.

    Matthew Pellan Cheng, M.D., C.M.1, Alim Hirji, M.D.2, Victoria Cook, M.D.3,4, David Roth, M.Sc5 and James Johnston, MD3,6, (1)Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)Respirology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Respirology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (4)Respirology, British Columbia Center for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (5)Tuberculosis, British Columbia Center for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (6)British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Disclosures:

    M. P. Cheng, None

    A. Hirji, None

    V. Cook, None

    D. Roth, None

    J. Johnston, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PST, Oct. 2nd with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.