1743. Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B Genotypes in Immunocompromised Patients
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Viral Infections; Pathogenesis and Epidemiology
Saturday, October 5, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Posters
  • IDSA poster.jpg (849.7 kB)
  • Background:

    A novel therapeutic human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA vaccine that includes glycoprotein B (gB) has recently undergone a successful phase 2 trial in allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. However, a few studies have analyzed gB genotypes and their association with clinical outcome in patients with various underlying diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the gB genotype distribution and its association with clinically significant factors such as survival rate and occurrence of tissue-invasive disease.

    Methods:

    This study was performed on 52 HCMV strains obtained from blood samples of immunocompromised patients presenting at a single tertiary center between January and April 2013. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing analysis were used to confirm the gB genotypes. Patients' clinical data were obtained from medical records.

    Results:

    Among the 52 patients, 26 (50%) had hematologic diseases including malignancy, 6 (12%) had solid organ cancers, 5 (10%) had autoimmune diseases, and the rest (28%) had infectious diseases. The prevalent genotypes of HCMV gB were type 1 (26, 50%) and 3 (24, 46%). No statistically significant difference was found between gB1 and gB3 distributions by disease among patients with and without hematologic disease (p=0.482). No statistically significant difference was noted between genotypes and all causes of in-hospital mortality (p=0.452). Among the 52 patients, 15 patients had HCMV disease, with HCMV pneumonitis being the most commonly identified (13/15, 86%). No statistically significant difference was found between the occurrence of HCMV disease and genotypes (p=0.879).

    Conclusion:

    In South Korea, HCMV gB1 and gB3 were both identified at similar levels. No significant difference was noted between gB1 and gB3 distributions with respect to underlying illness, survival, or occurrence of HCMV disease.

    Sun Bean Kim, MD1, Young Soun Lim2, Hea Won Ann, MD3, Jae Kyoung Kim, MD1, Heun Choi, MD1, Min Hyung Kim, M.D.1, Jin Young Ahn, MD1, Je Eun Song, M.D.1, Nam Su Ku, MD1, Su Jin Jeong, MD/PhD1, Sang Hoon Han, MD1, Jun Yong Choi, staff4 and June Myung Kim, MD1, (1)Department of Internal Medicine and AIDS Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (2)AIDS Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (3)Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (4)Yonsei university college of medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of

    Disclosures:

    S. B. Kim, None

    Y. S. Lim, None

    H. W. Ann, None

    J. K. Kim, None

    H. Choi, None

    M. H. Kim, None

    J. Y. Ahn, None

    J. E. Song, None

    N. S. Ku, None

    S. J. Jeong, None

    S. H. Han, None

    J. Y. Choi, None

    J. M. Kim, None

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