1777. Trends in HCV and Liver Related Causes of Death among People with HCV Infection in NYC, 2000 to 2010
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Viral Infections; Pathogenesis and Epidemiology
Saturday, October 5, 2013
Room: The Moscone Center: Poster Hall C
Background: Nationally and in New York City, the number of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related deaths is projected to continue to rise.  HCV infection is strongly associated with excess mortality due to viral hepatitis infection, liver cancer, and cirrhosis. We identified factors associated with dying of these causes among people with HCV infection in NYC.

Methods: The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) implemented CDC’s Program Collaboration and Service Integration (PCSI) initiative to improve understanding of infectious diseases in NYC.  We conducted a retrospective, deterministic cross-match of HIV and HCV surveillance data from 2000-2010, and vital statistics data from 2000-2011. HCV is a reportable disease; all positive antibody tests are included in the dataset.  For this analysis, we examined trends in deaths due to liver cancer, cirrhosis, and viral hepatitis, all of which may be caused or exacerbated by HCV infection. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals of demographic determinants associated with specific causes of deaths for people with HCV infection. 

Results: Among all persons with a positive HCV test in NYC, viral hepatitis, liver cancer, and cirrhosis deaths have been increasing from 2000 to 2010. Among HCV-diagnosed persons that died, younger age at death was associated with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis (<.01 for both comparisons), while older age at death was associated with liver cancer (<.01).  HCV-diagnosed men were more likely than HCV-diagnosed women to die from liver cancer, cirrhosis, and illicit drugs (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Asian/Pacific Islanders were at higher risk of liver cancer and viral hepatitis than whites (p<.01 for both comparisons).

Conclusion: Demographic factors are associated with different causes of death from HCV-related conditions. Among people with HCV infection, older Asian/Pacific Islander men may particularly benefit from screening for liver cancer.

Jessie Pinchoff, PhD Candidate, MPH1, Ann Drobnik, MPH2, Jennifer Fuld, PhD Candidate, MA2, Katherine Bornschlegel, MPH3, Sarah Braunstein, PhD, MPH4 and Jay Varma, MD5, (1)International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (2)Division of Disease Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY, (3)Bureau of Communicable Diseases, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY, (4)Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY, (5)Disease Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY

Disclosures:

J. Pinchoff, None

A. Drobnik, None

J. Fuld, None

K. Bornschlegel, None

S. Braunstein, None

J. Varma, None

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