Program Schedule

1523
Attitudes and Interest Toward HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among Participants Using HIV Non-Occupational Post-Exposure Prophylaxis

Session: Poster Abstract Session: HIV Prevention Strategies
Saturday, October 11, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Posters
  • IDSA PrEP attitudes poster.pdf (371.5 kB)
  • Background: Many persons who present for non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (NPEP) remain at increased risk for HIV acquisition because of recurrent practices. Limited data exist regarding facilitators and barriers to transitioning from non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (NPEP) to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for ongoing HIV prevention in this population.

    Methods: Participants enrolled in an observational study of co-formulated Tenofovir/Emtricitabine/Elvitegravir/Cobicistat for consensual NPEP were administered a survey to assess perceptions about and interest to use PrEP at day 14 (D14) and day 90 (D90) of an NPEP study at a large urban community health center between May, 2013 and March, 2014. Proportions were calculated for categorical variables. A Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test was used to measure differences in responses.

    Results: Of the 33 participants that completed the D14 and D90 visits for the NPEP study, 87% participants completed the D14 and D90 surveys, all of whom were men. Their mean age was 34.6, and most were Caucasian (79.3%) and men who have sex with men (86.2%). Most (65.5%) had heard of PrEP as of D14. Among 23 who reported having a primary care provider, 34.8% did not feel comfortable talking to their provider about PrEP, the most common reason (62.5%) being that they did not feel comfortable discussing sexual practices with them. Respondents were more likely to report that they thought they could access PrEP via an STD clinic (75.9%; p=0.008), an LGBT provider (86.2%; p=0.0008), or an HIV provider (86.2%; p=0.0008) than their primary care provider (41.4%). Most respondents (58.6%) expressed interest in starting PrEP at D14, which increased to 75.9% at D90 after completing NPEP (p=0.162). Of those that completed the NPEP study thus far, 24.2% were referred to a PrEP program, accessing medication through a research study or a medical provider.

    Conclusion: The majority of NPEP users reported a high interest in using PrEP, which tended to increase after completing their NPEP course. They perceived discomfort with discussing their sexual behavior with their PCP as a barrier to accessing PrEP compared to other clinical venues. Linkages should be strengthened between NPEP and PrEP programs.

    Sachin Jain, MD, MPH1,2, Charles Gregor, MPH2, Douglas Krakower, MD1,2, Jennifer Adelson-Mitty, MD, MPH1, Marcy Gelman, RN, MSN, MPH2 and Kenneth Mayer, MD1,2, (1)Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (2)The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, Boston, MA

    Disclosures:

    S. Jain, None

    C. Gregor, None

    D. Krakower, None

    J. Adelson-Mitty, None

    M. Gelman, None

    K. Mayer, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EDT, Oct. 8th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.

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