Program Schedule

918
Trends of device-associated infections in intensive care units after the establishment of national nosocomial infection surveillance system: results from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI Surveillance and Public Reporting
Friday, October 10, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Posters
  • ID week poster.pdf (557.7 kB)
  • Background: We hypothesized that the rate of device-associated infections (DAIs) in ICU would have decreased since the establishment of Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS) by the voluntary efforts for each participating institutes to improve infection control practices. Methods: Three major DAIs were studied: ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in ICU. We evaluated the time trend of the incidence of DAIs from 2006 through 2013 in KONIS participating ICUs. The pooled incidences of DAIs were calculated for each year of participation. In addition, data from only institutions that had participated in KONIS for at least 3 consecutive years were analyzed to further evaluate the effects of KONIS participation on the incidence of DAIs. Results: The number of ICUs participating KONIS gradually increased from 76 in 2006 to 162 in 2012. Rate of VAP significantly decreased from 2006 (3.48 per 1000 mechanical ventilator days) to 2012 (1.64 per 1000 mechanical ventilator days) (F=11, P<0.01). Rate of CAUTI decreased from 1.85 per 1000 urinary catheter days to 1.26, but the reduction was not significant (F=2.02, P=0.07). The change of CLABSI rate was not significant, as well (from 3.40 per 1000 central line days to 2.57, F=1.73, P=0.12). In 132 ICUs that had participated in KONIS for at least 3 consecutive years, the VAP rate significantly decreased from the 1st year to 3rd year (F=20.57, P<0.01), but the rate of CAUTI (F=1.06, P=0.35) and CLABSI (F=1.39, P=0.25) did not decrease. Conclusion: VAP rate in ICUs participating KONIS has decreased since the establishment of KONIS. Further efforts to reduce CLABSI rate should be performed in ICUs participating KONIS.  

    Figure 1. Time trend of rate of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in ICUs participating KONIS A. VAP rate from 2006 to 2012 (F=11, P<0.01) B. VAP rate of institutes that had participated in KONIS for at least 3 years (F=20.57, P<0.01)

    Jun Yong Choi1, Yee Gyung Kwak2, Hyeonmi Yoo3, Sang-Oh Lee, MD4, Hong Bin Kim, MD, PhD5, Su Ha Han6, Hee Jung Choi, MD7, Young Keun Kim, MD, PhD8, Sung Ran Kim9, Tae Hyong Kim, M.D.10, Hyukmin Lee11, Hee Kyung Chun12, Jae-Seok Kim13, Byung Wook Eun, MD, PhD14, Hyun-Sook Koo15, Geun-Ryang Bae15, Kyungwon Lee, MD, PhD16 and Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS), (1)Department of Internal Medicine and AIDS Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (2)Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, South Korea, (3)Infection Control Office, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul, South Korea, (4)Department of Infectious Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (5)Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea, (6)Soon Chun Hyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, South Korea, (7)Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea, (8)Internal Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, South Korea, (9)Infection Control Office, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, South Korea, (10)Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, South Korea, (11)Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, South Korea, (12)Department of Intection Control, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea, (13)Department of Laboratory Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, (14)Department of Pediatrics, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Seoul, South Korea, (15)Korea Centers for Disease Control & prevention, Osong, South Korea, (16)Department of Laboratory Medicine and Research Institute of Bacterial Resistance, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

    Disclosures:

    J. Y. Choi, None

    Y. G. Kwak, None

    H. Yoo, None

    S. O. Lee, None

    H. B. Kim, None

    S. H. Han, None

    H. J. Choi, None

    Y. K. Kim, None

    S. R. Kim, None

    T. H. Kim, None

    H. Lee, None

    H. K. Chun, None

    J. S. Kim, None

    B. W. Eun, None

    H. S. Koo, None

    G. R. Bae, None

    K. Lee, None

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