Program Schedule

217
The Oregon Antimicrobial Stewardship Collaborative (OASIS). Statewide Effectiveness on Re-Survey

Session: Poster Abstract Session: Antibiotic Stewardship
Thursday, October 9, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Posters
  • Re survey poster 2014 idweek final.pdf (332.4 kB)
  • Background: In 2012, the Oregon Public Health Division and Patient Safety Commission surveyed inpatient facilities to assess needs for establishing Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs (ASPs). During 2013, an ASP collaborative was conducted at 12 hospitals and all Oregon hospitals (62) were provided access to ASP resources including, webinars, learning sessions, and online materials. We re-surveyed all hospitals to assess changes following ASP collaborative and educational outreach efforts.

    Methods: We re-surveyed pharmacists, physicians, infection preventionists, and laboratory personnel in 62 acute-care hospitals in Oregon via an on-line survey monkey®, using the same questionnaire from 2012. We compared ASP resources, trends, and barriers observed among these hospitals using 2012- 2013 surveys.

    Results: In 2013, 58 out of 62 facilities responded. The tables assess important factors affecting ASPs compared to 2012.

     Small: ≤ 50 beds

    Medium: 50-199

    Large: >200 beds

    2013

    % change

    2013

    %  change

    2013

    % change

    Hospitals with ASP

    17(71%)

    n=24

    +32%

    14(78%)

    n=18

    +15%

    12(92%)

    n=13

    +25%

    Strong, well established ASP

    2(13%)

    n=15

    +13%

    2(13%)

    n=15

    -1%

    5(42%)

    n=12

    -8%

    Funding

    9(23%)

    n=40

    +5%

    6(23%)

    n=26

    +6%

    6(20%)

    n=30

    -3%

    Staffing

    13(33%)

     n=40

    +2%

    11(42%)

    n=26

    +3%

    12(40%)

    n=30

    +19%

    Buy in from corporate suite

    0(0%)

    -3%

    1(4%)

    n=26

    0%

    4(13%)

    n=30

    +5%

    Formulary Restriction

    7(12%)

    n=59

    -2%

    11(20%)

    n=55

    +8%

    10(15%)

    n=66

    +2%

    Streamline

    De-escalation

    6(10%)

    n=59

    +4%

    7(13%)

    n=55

    +1%

    7(11%)

    n=66

    -2%

    Dose Optimization/Adjustment

    9(15%)

    n=59

    -2%

    9(16%)

    n=55

    +3%

    10(15%)

    n=66

    +3%

    IV to PO

    10(10%)

    n=98

    +2%

    12(16%)

    n=77

    +3%

    9(11%)

    n=82

    +1%

    We saw increases in ASP formation in all hospital sizes, including non-collaborative hospitals. They were able to increase streamlining, dose optimization, and IV to PO strategies. However, despite these gains, most ASPs identified the lack of funding, staffing, and corporate suite support as limitations.

    Conclusion: The 2013 re-survey showed an increase of ASP establishment and activities. Although many hospitals still do not have an ASP. However, most hospitals did identify staffing, funding, and administrative barriers which will likely affect the future maintenance of these programs.

    Jwan Mohammadi, Infectious Diseases, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR, Lynne Strasfeld, MD, Division of Infectious Disease, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, Melissa Parkerton, MA, Oregon Patient Safety Commission, Portland, OR, Zintars G. Beldavs, MS, Acute & Communicable Disease Prevention, Oregon Health Authority, Portland, OR, Robert F. Arao, MPH, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority, Portland, OR and Graeme Forrest, MBBS, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR

    Disclosures:

    J. Mohammadi, None

    L. Strasfeld, None

    M. Parkerton, None

    Z. G. Beldavs, None

    R. F. Arao, None

    G. Forrest, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EDT, Oct. 8th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.

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