Program Schedule

891
Developing a user-friendly format for automated reports on urinary catheters and catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI Surveillance and Public Reporting
Friday, October 10, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Posters
  • CAUTI NLP Reporting Format_IDSA 2014_FINAL.pdf (1.0 MB)
  • Background:

    Manual surveillance and reporting for both urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) are time-consuming processes. Our goal was to develop a format for automated (computer-generated) CAUTI reports that would be comprehensible, useful, and trustworthy to providers engaged in CAUTI prevention.

    Methods:

    This study employed iterative design, in which we showed a sample data report to potential end-users, surveyed them about usability, and then revised the report accordingly.  We went through 4 such cycles, but we grouped the first 2 iterations into Version 1 and the second two into Version 2 because most design changes were made between iterations 2 and 3.  Our prototype report format contained a month of actual data from an acute care medical ward in our hospital. The survey consisted of 10 questions exploring the following domains: layout, understandability, completeness of data, and ability to replace current reporting methods. We recorded the time participants spent looking at the report and asked one quiz question to assess whether the participant could correctly interpret data provided.

    Results:

    The 40 participants surveyed included the following groups: physicians (12), ward nurses (15), nurse CAUTI champions (6), quality managers (4), and infection control specialists (3). The average time spent looking at the report was 47.2 seconds (SD = 31.5s). Report Version 1: Only 45% answered the quiz question correctly. Of the 4 domains, the lowest score was in layout, receiving an average of 3.3/5 points. Users' comments suggested that a more graphical display of catheter days was needed. Report Version 2 (Figure 1): 76% answered the quiz question correctly. The lowest scoring domain was ability to replace current reporting methods, with an average score of 3.2/5 points. User comments suggested that the report will need to meet the disparate needs of different provider types.

    Conclusion:

    The iterative design process improved users' abilities to correctly interpret urinary catheter data from our report. We identified different needs of different provider types in terms of catheter and CAUTI data, as a prelude to switching to automated surveillance.


    FIGURES:

    Figure 1. Front and back sides of report version 2.

    Bryan A. Campbell, PhD1, Deborah Horwitz, MS, PA-C2,3,4, Ashley J. Gendrett, BS, MPH5, Sarah Krein, PhD, RN6,7, Sanjay Saint, MD, MPH6,7, Anne Sales, PhD, RN8,9, Adi Gundlapalli, MD, PhD, MS10, Marjorie Carter, MSPH11 and Barbara W. Trautner, MD, PhD, FIDSA3,4,12, (1)Houston Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness & Safety (IQuESt), Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, (2)Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (3)Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (4)Houston Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness, and Safety (iQuESt), Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, (5)Houston Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness, and Safety (iQuESt), Michael E. Debakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, (6)Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, (7)Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, (8)Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, (9)Division of Nursing Business and Health Systems, University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, (10)Clinical Epidemiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, (11)Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, (12)Section of Infectious Diseases, Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

    Disclosures:

    B. A. Campbell, None

    D. Horwitz, None

    A. J. Gendrett, None

    S. Krein, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation: Grant Investigator, Research grant and Research support
    Department of Veterans Affairs: Employee and Investigator, Research support and Salary

    S. Saint, None

    A. Sales, None

    A. Gundlapalli, None

    M. Carter, None

    B. W. Trautner, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EDT, Oct. 8th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.

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