Program Schedule

852
Housewide use of Chlorehexidine Bathing to reduce Healthcare Associated Infections

Session: Poster Abstract Session: Device-Associated HAIs
Friday, October 10, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Background:

Healthcare associated infections negatively impact patient outcomes and increase healthcare costs.  Interventions have focused on specific risk factors, the presence or absence of indwelling urinary catheter for example, and interventions that could be applied across broadly have been limited.  Following the publication of the experience with Chlorhexidine bathing on central line infections and MDRO acquisition in critically ill and bone marrow populations, we sought to examine the impact of this intervention on CLA-BSI, CA-UTI, and MDRO acquisition when applied to patients in both critical and acute care.

Methods:

This qausi-experimental study examined the impact of CHG-bathing to all patients (1)in an adult critical care unit or (2) on an acute care floor if the patient had a central line, indwelling urinary catheter, or colonized with CRE.  At the request of the stem cell attending, allogeneic bone marrow transplant patients were excluded.  The rate of device related infections where compared pre and post intervention. 

Results:
For CAUTI, The average monthly rate per 1000 IUC days fell from 4.3 prior to HG bathing to 2.8 post implementation (p-value <0.001).  For CLA-BSI, the average rate for the whole hospital declined from 3.2/1000 central line days to 0.88/1,000 central line days (p-value <0.001).  MDRO transmission is still being analyzed. 

Conclusion:

CHG bathing throughout the hospital setting targeting at patient with specific risk factors was associated with a marked decline in both our CA-UTI and CLA-BSI rate.  Analysis of this trend over time and a dose response are pending.

Kyle Enfield, MD MS, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonology, Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Prevention and Control, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, Costi D. Sifri, MD, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Prevention and Control, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, Elizabeth Enfield, RN, MSN, Coronary Care Unit, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, Jessica Lewis, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, Beth Quatrara, DNP, RN, CMSRN, ACNS-BC, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, Eve Giannetta, RN, BSN, CIC, Infection Prevention and Control, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, Kristi Kimpel, RN, MSN, Surgical Trauma Burn ICU, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA and Kathleen Rea, RN, MSN, Surgical Services/5 Central, UNiversity of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Disclosures:

K. Enfield, None

C. D. Sifri, None

E. Enfield, None

J. Lewis, None

B. Quatrara, None

E. Giannetta, None

K. Kimpel, None

K. Rea, None

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EDT, Oct. 8th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.

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