Program Schedule

335
Infrequent Air Contamination with Acinetobacter baumannii Surrounding Known Colonized/Infected patients

Session: Poster Abstract Session: Multidrug-resistant Organisms: Epidemiology and Prevention
Thursday, October 9, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Background:

Air sampling during outbreaks has demonstrated a potential for airborne transmission of Acinetobacter baumannii. The aim of this study was to assess air contamination with A. baumanniiin an endemic situation and to examine associated patient factors.

Methods:

This study was conducted in seven intensive care units at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland, between May and December 2013. Patients with a culture positive for A. baumannii within the previous 5 days were identified.  Air surrounding the patient was sampled for one hour, 3 feet from the head of the bed, using the Six-Stage Viable Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) (ThermoScientific). RambaCHROM™ Acinetobacter Agar plates were incubated at 37°C in ambient air for 24 hours. Patient factors such as presence of wounds, diarrhea and medical devices and antibiotic therapy were collected.

Results:

We sampled the rooms of 12 patients known to be colonized or infected with A. baumannii. Two colony forming units of A.baumannii were isolated in the air surrounding one patient. (Patient 1 on table below). The particles carrying A. baumannii were equal to or larger than 7.0µm in size.  A. baumanniiwas not found in the air surrounding the remaining patients. The table below shows the characteristics of all patients sampled.

Conclusion:

We found that A. baumannii infrequently contaminated the air surrounding patients known to be colonized or infected with A. baumannii; many of whom were on a closed ventilation circuit. More studies need to be done to determine which patients are more likely to contaminate the surrounding air.

 

Patient number

Culture Site

MDR

Mechanical Ventilation

Urinary catheter

Central venous catheter

Wound

Diarrhea

Antibiotics

1 *

Sputum

Catheter tip

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

2

Sputum

Peri-anal

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

No

No

3

Sputum

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

No

4

Sputum

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

yes

No

5

Sputum

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

6

Sputum

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

7

Sputum

Peri-anal

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

8

Wound

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

9

Sputum peri-anal

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

10

Sputum

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

11

Blood

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

12

Sputum

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

*= Patient 1 had A. baumannii isolated from the surrounding air.

Clare Rock, MD1, Anthony D. Harris, MD, MPH1, J. Kristie Johnson, PhD1,2, Werner Bischoff3 and Kerri Thom, MD, MS1, (1)Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (3)Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, North Carolina, NC

Disclosures:

C. Rock, None

A. D. Harris, None

J. K. Johnson, None

W. Bischoff, None

K. Thom, None

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