Program Schedule

1740
Assessment of Antimicrobial Efficacy on New Fiber Embedded with Silver

Session: Poster Abstract Session: Public Health
Saturday, October 11, 2014
Room: The Pennsylvania Convention Center: IDExpo Hall BC
Background: Silver has been used for years in the medical field due to its antibacterial efficacy. Silver has been applied topically to fabrics as an antimicrobial agent but the process lacks efficacy because the silver percent is too low. A new yarn which can be used to weave or knit fabrics uses novel technology to extrude the silver into the yarn fibers. This process allows the silver to physically disperse and embed, throughout the yarn and subsequently the fabric. Fabrics made with this technology do not “wash off” and is made in different strengths depending on the degree of antimicrobial activity required. The object of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of the innovative fabric. Medium strength antimicrobial activity fabrics were used in this study.

Methods: Swatches of the 1” square material were placed into sterile petri dishes, inoculated with 0.1 mL of the bacteria or surrogate virus (bacteriophage MS-2). Spores of the mold Trichophyton mentagrophyteswere also tested. At the contact time points of 2 and 4 hours, samples were taken and processed according to the appropriate assay for bacteria, virus or mold being tested.

Results: Results are in the following table.

Organism

 

Percent Reduction

 

2 Hour Contact Time

4 Hour Contact Time

Methicillin-Resistant

Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

99.7

99.997

Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

99.95

99.999

Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE)

99.90

99.9999

Escherichia coli

99.98

99.998

Staphylococcus aureus

99.96

99.98

Salmonella choleraesuis

99.99

99.99

MS-2

3.9

99.5

Propionibacterium acnes

99.999

>99.999

Trichophyton mentagrophytes

44.9

>99.998

Conclusion: This unique fabric has demonstrated antimicrobial properties against a wide range of bacteria, mold and a surrogate virus within 2 to 4 hours. The fiber or yarn can be knit or woven to make most any fabric used in home, industrial or hospital environments where a reduction of bacteria, mold and virus on garments or linens would be advantageous.

Sheri Carlino, B.S. and Charles Gerba, Ph.D., Soil, Water and Environmental Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Disclosures:

S. Carlino, None

C. Gerba, Consumer Specialty Products Association: Consultant, Consulting fee

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