1862. Improving Obstetric Health Care Providers’ Attitude and Beliefs Regarding Influenza Vaccination in Pregnancy
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Vaccines: Improving Immunization Uptake
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • IDSA_Poster-sept_26.pdf (646.2 kB)
  • Background: To assess whether an educational intervention can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of non-physician obstetric healthcare providers regarding influenza and vaccination in pregnancy.  

    Methods: Prospective cohort study of non-physician obstetric health care providers (nurses, medical assistants, certified nurse assistants, receptionists and administrators) at a tertiary care center’s clinic, antepartum unit, and postpartum units as well as three private practices.  Participants were asked to complete the first survey of 16 questions assessing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about influenza vaccination.  One to three weeks following the survey, participants were asked to participate in an 8 minute educational presentation immediately followed by a second, identical survey.  The primary outcome was the change in the percentage of providers who would recommend the flu vaccine to pregnant women.

    Results: Of 285 eligible providers, 202 (71%) completed the first survey.  Of those who completed the 1stsurvey, 83 (41%) participated in the educational presentation and completed the second survey.  There was no difference in race/ethnicity, job description, and years in the current position between the pre- and post-presentation groups.  There was a significant increase in the percentage of providers who would recommend the flu vaccine to pregnant women (73% vs 89%, p=0.004).  There was also a  significant improvement in beliefs about vaccine efficacy (82% vs 93%, p=0.03), safety (71% vs 87%, p=0.006), and safety in pregnancy (57% vs 80%, p<0.001), as well as a significant  improvement in knowledge that pregnant women are at increased risk of complications from the flu (71% vs 86%, p=0.01).  There was no significant improvement in knowledge about universival flu vaccination recommendation in pregnancy (88% vs 95%, p=0.08), in the percentage who would receive the vaccine if pregnant (78% vs 83%, p=0.42), or in those who correctly identified flu symptoms (56% vs 63%, p=0.36). 

    Conclusion: An 8 minute educational presentation was effective in improving knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of influenza and vaccination in pregnancy of non-physician obstetric healthcare providers. Future study should assess whether the use of the educational presentation actually increases the rates of influenza vacination among pregnant women.

    Lindsay Maggio, MD1, Phinnara Has, MS2 and Brenna Hughes, MD, MSc1, (1)Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Women & Infants’ Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, RI, (2)Division of Research, Women & Infants’ Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, RI

    Disclosures:

    L. Maggio, None

    P. Has, None

    B. Hughes, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.