1864. Adolescent HPV vaccine attitudes by education level and factors associated with vaccine completion
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Vaccines: Improving Immunization Uptake
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • 1864_IDWposter.pdf (435.0 kB)
  • Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake remains low despite state- and nation-wide interventions. We aim to describe HPV vaccine attitudes by education level and factors associated with vaccine series completion.

    Methods: An anonymous, self-administered survey regarding HPV vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and receipt was distributed to students aged 14 through 26 years in high school (HS), college, and health care professional (HCP) school by peers in the same level from October 2014 to February 2015. 

    Results: 788 students were included; 415 (53%) in HS, 252 (32%) college, and 121 (16%) HCP school. 343 (44%) were male. HS and college students (76%) were more likely than HCP students (61%) to report provider vaccine recommendation (p<0.002). HCP students were more likely than HS and college students to report that HPV vaccine protects against genital warts (78% vs 60%, p<0.001), genital cancer (92% vs 72%, p<0.0001), and head and neck cancer (62% vs 23%, p<0.0001). HS and college students were more likely to express concern for short-term side effects (p<0.0001), long-term health risks (p<0.0001), and the belief that vaccine is unnecessary (p<0.0001). Students with a pediatrician or obstetrician/gynecologist were more likely to receive vaccine recommendations (82%) than those with a family provider or internist (62%, p<0.0001). Provider recommendation was strongly associated with vaccine completion (61% vs 6%, p<0.0001). Students whose information source was a doctor were more likely to have completed vaccine series than those whose information source was family/friends (p=0.009). HPV vaccine completion was associated with the beliefs that vaccine is important for female (p=0.001) and male (p=0.001) health, is safe (p<0.0001), is effective in genital cancer prevention (p=0.001), having friends who received HPV vaccine (p<0.0001) and lack of short-term (p=0.0001) or long-term (p=0.0001) vaccine concerns.

    Conclusion: HS and college students, although more likely to receive vaccine recommendation, had a more negative attitude towards HPV vaccine than HCP students. Future educational programs should be geared to younger adolescents to improve understanding of HPV vaccine and its effectiveness in cancer prevention.

    Manika Suryadevara, MD1, Joshua Bonville, BS1, Rachael Kline, BS2, Colleen Magowan, NA3, Elizabeth Domachowske, BS4, Donald Cibula, PhD1 and Joseph B. Domachowske, MD1, (1)SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, (2)Binghamton University -- SUNY, Binghamton, NY, (3)Baldwinsville Central High School, Baldwinsville, NY, (4)SUNY Fredonia, Fredonia, NY

    Disclosures:

    M. Suryadevara, GlaxoSmithKline: Investigator , Research support

    J. Bonville, None

    R. Kline, None

    C. Magowan, None

    E. Domachowske, None

    D. Cibula, None

    J. B. Domachowske, GlaxoSmithKline: Investigator and Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee and Research support
    Merck: Investigator and Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee and Research support

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.