288. Reduction in CAUTI and Urinary Catheter Utilization Rates on a Medical Unit and a Respiratory Step Down Unit
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: Device Associated Infections
Thursday, October 8, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • MossIDwk2015 (2)final.pdf (1.4 MB)
  • Background:   Hospital acquired urinary tract infections are the third most common nosocomial infection. 75% are associated with a urinary catheter. A framework for daily interdisciplinary communication of catheter necessity and monitoring of maintenance bundle practices is needed to reduce catheter utilization and the risk for catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). Effective communication strategies and monitoring tools will decrease CAUTI and device utilization rates. Methods:   Two units with fluctuating CAUTI rates, standardized infection ratios (SIR), and device utilization rates were chosen as the study units. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters were followed on a daily basis for a period of two years and continued into the third year. The first year established baseline rates which were compared to post-intervention rates during the second and third years of the project. All rates, SIRs, and percentiles were compared to National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) benchmarks using the “Rate Table for Catheter-Associated UTI Data” and the "SIR for All Catheter-Associated UTI Data” analysis reports.  Results:   The Respiratory Step Down unit has achieved and maintained a zero CAUTI rate for the year 2014 through the year 2015 to date.  Catheter device utilization decreased from the 70th to the 33rd percentile. The Medical Unit has achieved and maintained a zero CAUTI rate for the year 2014 through the year 2015 to date. Catheter device utilization decreased from the 22nd to the 8th percentile. There has been a significant reduction in device utilization for both units (p < 0.00001) Conclusion:   Implementation of daily interdisciplinary communication strategies and bundle monitoring tools led to a significant decrease in CAUTI rates, SIRs, and device utilization on both units. Tools that guide health care providers to ensure compliance with maintenance bundles and the removal of urinary catheters in a timely manner leads to the prevention of CAUTIs in hospitalized patients.
    Marie Moss, RN, BSN, MPH, CIC1, Brian Koll, MD, FACP, FIDSA2, Aileen Tanafranca, MSN, RN, CCRN, NE-BC3, Barbara Barnett, MD4, Margaret Amato-Hayes, MSN, RN, NE-BC3, Leslyn Williamson, MPH, MSN, DNP, RN, NEA-BC3, Samuel Acquah, MD5, Robbie Freeman, MSN, RN-BC3, Irene Jankowski, MSN, APN-BC, CWOCN3, Jason Filopei, MD6 and Ryu Tofts, MD7, (1)Infection Prevention, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, (2)Infection Prevention, Mount Sinai Health System, New York, NY, (3)Patient Care Services, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, (4)Administration, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, (5)Critical Care, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, (6)Pulmonary Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, (7)Pulmonary Medicine and Critical Care, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY

    Disclosures:

    M. Moss, None

    B. Koll, None

    A. Tanafranca, None

    B. Barnett, None

    M. Amato-Hayes, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Petrie: Employee , Salary

    L. Williamson, None

    S. Acquah, None

    R. Freeman, None

    I. Jankowski, None

    J. Filopei, None

    R. Tofts, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.