395. Attitudes among Men and Women Regarding Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis to Prevent HIV Acquisition in an Urban HIV-Prevalent Setting in the United States
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HIV Prevention: PrEP and other Targeted Approaches
Thursday, October 8, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • PrEP IDSA poster_v5.pdf (317.7 kB)
  • Background: The use of antiretroviral agents to prevent HIV acquisition, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for persons at risk for acquiring HIV. While studies have shown the importance of adherence for optimal efficacy, there are limited data on the attitudes among US men and women towards the use and perceived benefits of PrEP.  

    Methods: An anonymous English language survey was distributed to a convenience sample of male and female patients ≥18 years of age who attended a general medicine clinic in Newark, New Jersey, an urban area with 2.1% HIV prevalence. Survey responses were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC) and proportions were compared using Chi-square tests.

    Results: Of 175 subjects approached to complete the survey, 72 (41%) declined (63% not interested, 31% Spanish speaking only). Of the 103 respondents, 57% were female, 73% were >35 years old and 66% were black. Sixty seven percent reported they had never had a sexually transmitted infection (STI). The majority (89% of women and 68% of men) had been tested for HIV though most (83% of women and 77% of men) felt their risk of acquiring an STI including HIV was low. In general, attitudes towards PrEP did not differ greatly among men and women (Table).

    Table. Key Results of Survey

    Attitudes towards PrEP*

    Men (%)

    N=44

    Women (%)

    N=59

    Overall (%)

    N=103

    Heard of PrEP before survey

    21

    11

    15

    Interested in PrEP

    44

    45

    45

    Would be concerned about people finding out they were taking PrEP (p-value 0.04)

    56

    35

    44

    Single factor that would stop respondents from taking PrEP

      Do not know enough about the medication

      Concerns about side effects

      Concerns about cost

      Other

    38

    36

    15

    30

    23

    29

    17

    10

    29

    32

    17

    22

    Believe PrEP will not prevent HIV transmission 100% of the time

    81

    75

    78

    *All p-values for differences between men and women>0.1 unless otherwise noted

    Conclusion: In an HIV-prevalent urban setting in the United States, few men or women attending a general medicine clinic had heard of PrEP. Although most felt their risk for HIV acquisition was low, 45% responded that they would be interested in PrEP. Our data suggest that most identified barriers to using PrEP could be addressed though effective patient education programs. Surprisingly, cost was not a major perceived barrier to using PrEP.

    Catherine Koper, MD1, Nila Dharan, MD2, Baljinder Singh, MA2, Debra Chew, MD2, Shobha Swaminathan, MD3 and Sally Hodder, MD4, (1)St. Joseph Health System, Humboldt Medical Specialists, Eureka, CA, (2)New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, (3)Internal Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, (4)West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV

    Disclosures:

    C. Koper, None

    N. Dharan, None

    B. Singh, None

    D. Chew, None

    S. Swaminathan, None

    S. Hodder, Gilead: Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee
    Viiv: Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee
    Janssen: Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee
    Bristol-Myers Squibb: Scientific Advisor , Consulting fee

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.