1744. Probiotic Use Among Participants in the Stanford Research Registry
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Outbreaks of Bad Bugs and Prevention in Children
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • 1744.pdf (497.3 kB)
  • Background: Probiotics use has skyrocketed in the US.  Little is known, however, about patient knowledge, attitudes, practices and behaviors around probiotic use.

    Methods: An anonymous short electronic survey was administered to members of the Stanford Research Registry that includes ~1,300 people who agreed to be contacted for participation in research studies. Invitations were sent via email with reminders sent after one week and one month to those who had not completed the survey. Questions were asked about probiotic and antibiotic use in the prior three months.

    Results: After the first reminder, 269 participants had completed the survey, for an overall response rate of 29%. Men and women were equally likely to regularly use probiotics for health maintenance (55%). Probiotics used included food products (88% of probiotic users) and/or supplements (54%). Health care providers (HCP) (83% of whom were physicians) prescribed antibiotics to  63 (23%) respondents in the preceding three months. Almost all patients (95%) completed their course despite diarrhea in 25%. Among the 63 antibiotic users, 21 (33%) initiated or changed probiotics, usually without a recommendation from their prescribing HCP (72%). Those who initiated probiotics before or at the same time as the antibiotic appeared somewhat less likely to report diarrhea than those who started them after beginning antibiotics (50% vs. 83%; p=0.31)).  

    Conclusion: Regular probiotic use among patients is common. Typically, the probiotics are not recommended by a HCP, even in conjunction with antibiotic prescriptions.  Although we observed a trend towards decreased antibiotic-associated diarrhea rates among probiotic users, choice of probiotics seemed to be left largely to patients, and was not framed by extant research in this field.

    Table: Supplements used routinely and when prescribed antibiotics (%)

     

    For health maintenance (N=269)

    While taking antibiotics (N=63)

    Probiotic mixtures

    37

    57

    Bifidobacteria

    10

    0

    Lactobacillus

    L. acidophilus

    L. casei

    L. reuteri

    L. rhamnosus

    Lactobacillus - mixtures

    10

    33

    19

    1

    10

    1

    14

    0

    0

    0

    14

    0

    Saccharomyces boulardii

    3

    14

    Other

    9

    7

    Not specified

    19

    7


    Catherine Ley, PhD, Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA and Julie Parsonnet, MD, FIDSA, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

    Disclosures:

    C. Ley, None

    J. Parsonnet, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.