1401. Antiviral Activity of Gendine Gloves against Ebola Virus for Reducing Transmission in Ebola Treatment Settings
Session: Poster Abstract Session: All Things Ebola
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Room: Poster Hall

Background: Ebola virus (EBOV) is fatal to humans and is easily spread by contact through virus shedding in bodily fluids from infected patients. Current practices to treat infected patients focus on supportive therapy in Ebola Clinics and controlling the potential spread to others via contact transmission. Antiviral gloves can provide additional means to protect healthcare workers and patients against EBOV exposure. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of Gendine antimicrobial gloves against multi-drug resistant bacteria including emerging carbapenem-resistant pathogens. In this study we examined the antiviral efficacy of Gendine gloves against EBOV.

Methods: Disposable nitrile gloves were coated with a proprietary biopolymer film containing Gendine, (novel combination of chlorhexdine and the antiseptic dye gentian violet). The efficacy of the Gendine-coated gloves was tested following the quantitative ISO 22196 method. Briefly, 6 cmsegments were cut from each glove and exposed to 35uL of EBOV Zaire Kikwit suspension containing 5x106 plaque forming units (PFU)/mL. Following, exposure, the glove segment was placed in neutralizing broth to halt all antiseptic activity and release virions into suspension. The resulting suspension was serially diluted and quantitative cultured by standard plaque assay on Vero E6 (African Green Monkey kidney cells) monolayers. Following optimal incubation monolayers were stained with neutral red and visible plaques were enumerated. All experiments were conducted under Biosafety Level 4 conditions at the Galveston National Laboratory.

Results: Gendine coated nitrile gloves achieved approximately a 99.9% kill after exposure to high concentrations of EBOV (Figure 1).

Conclusion: Preliminary in vitro testing shows that a novel disposable glove coated with Gendine was effective in reducing EBOV loads from high concentrations. This reduction is promising and warrants additional optimization to enhance activity.

Figure 1 Antiviral Efficacy of Gendine gloves against live Ebola Virus (Strain Zaire).

Jason Comer, PhD1, Trevor Brasel, PhD2, Bersabeh Tigabu, DVM, Ph.D.3, Ruth Reitzel, MS4,5, Joel Rosenblatt, PhD6 and Issam Raad, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA4, (1)Microbiology and Immunology Study Director, Institutional Office of Regulated Nonclinical Studie, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, galveston, TX, (2)The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, (3)The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, (4)Infectious Diseases, Infection Control & Employee Health, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, (5)Infectious Diseases, Infection Control & Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, (6)1515 Holcombe - Suite FCT12.6030, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Disclosures:

J. Comer, None

T. Brasel, None

B. Tigabu, None

R. Reitzel, None

J. Rosenblatt, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center: Shareholder , Licensing agreement or royalty
Novel Anti-Infective Technologies LLC: Shareholder , Licensing agreement or royalty

I. Raad, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center: Shareholder , Licensing agreement or royalty
Novel Anti-Infective Technologies LLC: Shareholder , Licensing agreement or royalty

See more of: All Things Ebola
See more of: Poster Abstract Session
<< Previous Abstract | Next Abstract

Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.