450. Outcomes of Peer Instruction in an Infectious Diseases Elective Course for Third-Year Pharmacy Students
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Innovations in Medical Education
Thursday, October 8, 2015
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • Shah - Peer Instruction in Infectious Diseases Elective for Third Year Pharmacy Students.pdf (389.9 kB)
  • Background: An abbreviated 7-week course on advanced infectious diseases pharmacotherapy was developed and delivered by infectious diseases pharmacists for third-year students in a PharmD program. The course included faculty-generated instruction (75%) and student-generated instruction (25%). Technology was used to capture and post student-generated instruction for asynchronous learning outside of class. There are limited data on the use of technology for peer-to-peer instruction and its impact on student performance. The study objective was to compare student performance on faculty- versus student-generated instruction.

    Methods: Students worked in small groups to develop and asynchronously deliver case-based presentations on novel topics within infectious diseases not seen before in the curriculum. The course coordinators ensured accuracy of student-generated instruction. Student performance on faculty- and student-generated content was compared by using item analysis of exam questions on a cumulative assessment; all questions were written by faculty. A survey was administered at the beginning and end of the course to determine student attitudes towards technology and peer instruction.

    Results: The course was offered in the Spring semesters of 2013-2015. All fifty-nine students enrolled were included in the data analysis of exam questions. The survey response rate was 98%. Exam item analyses showed similar student performance between faculty- and student-generated content (see Table 1). Many students indicated a lack of experience in using technology for peer instruction. Student comfort with being assessed on peer-generated content improved from 76% to 95%, and 95% were confident that they learned from their peers.

    Conclusion: The use of technology may allow for peer-to-peer instruction without adversely affecting student performance. This method augmented traditional classroom instruction in an abbreviated course on advanced infectious diseases pharmacotherapy.

    Table 1: Comparison of Student Performance on Exam Questions

     

    Percent of Exam Questions Answered Correctly

    Correct Response

    Faculty-generated instruction

    Student-generated instruction

    100%

    28.9%

    25%

    90+%

    50.1%

    50%

    80+%

    78%

    80.6%

    75+%

    85.7%

    88.9%

    Bhavik Shah, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP and Jason Schafer, PharmD, MPH, BCPS, AAHIVP, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

    Disclosures:

    B. Shah, None

    J. Schafer, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 7th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.