737. Vaccine Attitudes and Practices Among Family Medicine (FM) Providers Across New York State Following Changes in ACIP Vaccine Recommendations
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Vaccines: Improving Delivery
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • Suryadevara IDWeek 2016.pdf (224.7 kB)
  • Background: Provider vaccine hesitancy represents a potential barrier to vaccinations. We describe FM provider vaccine beliefs and behaviors.

    Methods: FM providers from NYS completed an anonymous self-administered survey regarding vaccine attitudes and practices between January and March 2016.

    Results: 177 surveys were completed by physicians (70%) and mid-level providers (30%). 160 providers always recommend standard pediatric vaccines, yet only 79% of this group always recommend HPV vaccine to eligible 11-12 year olds. 73% of providers strongly disagreed that administering HPV vaccine to adolescents increases the likelihood of unprotected sex. Fewer than 75% strongly disagreed that multiple vaccines administered at a visit reduced vaccine efficacy or overwhelms the immune system. Only 83% of providers strongly disagreed that autism is a possible effect of vaccines. Mid-level providers were more likely than physicians to have higher mean levels of agreement that autism is a possible effect of vaccines (p=0.02), multiple vaccines administered at a visit reduces efficacy or overwhelms the immune system (p < 0.001), and administering HPV vaccine to adolescents increases the likelihood of unprotected sex (p=0.001). Providers in practice for <10 years were more likely than those in practice longer to have higher mean levels of agreement that multiple vaccines administered at a visit reduces efficacy or overwhelms the immune system (p =0.01), and administering HPV vaccine to adolescents increases the likelihood of unprotected sex (p=0.04). The 177 providers were still more likely to recommend HPV vaccine to eligible patients aged 13-18 years (88%) than 11-12 years (75%) or 19-26 years (70%). Only 73% of providers immunized pregnant women in the office. These providers were more likely to recommend influenza vaccine (p=0.01) to their pregnant patients. 3% of providers stated they were vaccine hesitant, yet 32% do not always recommend standard pediatric, influenza, pertussis, HPV, pneumococcal, or zoster vaccines to eligible patients for whom a category A ACIP recommendation exists.

    Conclusion: Vaccine hesitancy is under-recognized among FM providers. Vaccine misperceptions continue to be noted, revealing the need for ongoing provider education.

    Cynthia Bonville, MS1, Joseph B. Domachowske II, MD, FIDSA, FPIDS2 and Manika Suryadevara, MD1, (1)SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, (2)Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY

    Disclosures:

    C. Bonville, None

    J. B. Domachowske II, Glaxo Smith Kline: Investigator , Research grant
    Pfizer: Investigator , Research grant
    Astra Zeneca: Investigator , Research grant
    Novavax: Investigator , Research grant

    M. Suryadevara, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. CDT, Wednesday Oct. 26th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.