1540. Acceptability and Barriers to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Atlanta’s Adolescents and their Parents
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HIV Pediatric and Adolescents
Friday, October 28, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • tp_72x48_Acceptability and Barriers Poster Final Version_Rev2[1].pdf (202.8 kB)
  • Background: Adolescents aged 13-24 years account for 23% of new HIV infections in Atlanta. However, data on HIV prevention strategies in this population is lacking. Use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in adults has shown good acceptability and risk reduction of HIV by up to 92%. This study aims to understand the acceptability of and barriers to PrEP in adolescents and their parents.

    Methods: We administered validated PrEP acceptability and barriers measures to HIV(-) 13-17 year olds from January-April 2016 in an adolescent clinic and emergency department in Atlanta, GA. Total measure scores (acceptability = AS; barriers = BS) were calculated by averaging survey items and ranged from 1 to 3. For AS, 1 was very unlikely, while 3 was very likely to accept PrEP; concomitantly, scores near 3 indicated fewer barriers to PrEP. Participants were stratified by risk group (high versus low), high risk being: more than three lifetime partners, unprotected sex, use of alcohol or drugs before sex, and lack of consistent and correct condom use. Two-sample testing and Pearson correlations were used to evaluate between groups.

    Results: 102 adolescent/parent dyads were recruited. Adolescents were 67% female, 94% black, with mean age of 15.7 ± 1.5 years. Overall, 17% met high risk criteria. Thirty one percent admitted having sex, of those, 53% used condoms routinely. Three percent had a previous sexually transmitted illness, but none were aware of their HIV status. Overall AS averaged between somewhat to very likely (2.4 ± 0.5) with no differences between risk groups (p=0.571). BS averaged between unlikely and somewhat likely (2.0 ± 0.4) with no differences between risk groups (p=0.180).

    Parents were 94% female, 96% black, with mean age of 42.5 ± 8.9 years. Nearly all (93%) had conversations about sex with their teenagers, and 23% knew their child was sexually active. Overall parent AS averaged between somewhat likely and very likely (2.2 ± 0.6), and BS averaged between unlikely and somewhat likely (1.9 ± 0.5) with no difference between risk groups (p=0.276 and p=0.333).

    Conclusion: The adolescent/parent dyad are likely to accept PrEP and its implementation as an HIV prevention method, regardless of risk. These results support future PrEP research in adolescents.

    Meera Shah, BS, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, Stephanie Holt, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, Claudia R. Morris, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, Scott E. Gillespie, MS, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA and Andres Camacho-Gonzalez, MD, MSc., Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

    Disclosures:

    M. Shah, None

    S. Holt, None

    C. R. Morris, None

    S. E. Gillespie, None

    A. Camacho-Gonzalez, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. CDT, Wednesday Oct. 26th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.