1363. Implementation of an instantaneous Pathogen Specific Surveillance (iPaSS) System
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: Epidemiologic Methods
Friday, October 28, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • IDSA2016_Poster (AF-newPics).pdf (740.9 kB)
  • Background: Real-time monitoring of infectious disease (ID) across the United States benefits public health. Tracking ID requires 1) comprehensive, diagnostic testing and 2) rapid automated collection, analysis and distribution of this data. The first requirement has been met. Several diagnostic platforms are available for testing large groups of infectious agents causing similar syndromes. BioFire’s FilmArray® (FA) Instrument is one such system. The FA® Respiratory Pathogen (RP) panel detects 20 organisms. However, the second requirement for ID tracking has not been fully addressed; there is no general mechanism for exporting test results and integrating the information across time and space. Existing ID surveillance systems are limited to a small number of pathogens, labor intensive and slow, complex to implement, geographically localized or based only on symptoms.

    Methods: We have implemented an iPaSS system: FA-Trend. It automates the flow of test results from FA instruments to a secure, HIPAA-compliant, database in real time. Specific views of this information can be presented to different audiences: source laboratories can track local trends and the public will have an up-to-date view of viruses and bacteria currently circulating. This approach does not require data extraction from hospital information systems that vary between hospitals, and does not need labor intensive manual data extraction.

    Results: FA Trend software was installed on 55 FA instruments at 14 US sites. Most IRBs ruled this study exempt. Greater than 50,000 runs were uploaded to the database. Data presented will include plots of: 1) Pathogen prevalence by institution and in aggregate, displaying annual fluctuations of influenza and seasonality of organisms; 2) Polymicrobial detection to look for over- or under-represented co-detections; 3) Pouch testing rate fluctuations, comparted with the CDC Influenza-Like Illness trends; 4) Comparison of the onset and duration of specific pathogens making up the respiratory season at different sites.

    Conclusion: FA Trend is easily scalable (number of sites and different panels) and the lessons learned will make it easier to bring the next 100 to 500 laboratories on board. As the participants and scope of FA-Trend expands it will be possible to demonstrate, in real time and in high resolution, the spread of various IDs across the US.

    Lindsay Meyers, MD, Data Science, Post Market Surveillance, BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT, Robert K. Nelson, B.S., Information Systems, BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT, Frederick Nolte, PhD, D(ABMM), F(AAM), Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, Virginia Donovan, MD, Pathology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, Jennifer Dien Bard, Ph.D, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, Gregory Storch, MD, FIDSA, FPIDS, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, Silvia Spitzer, PhD;HCLD, Pathology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, Hossein Salimnia, Ph.D., Dept. of Pathology, Wayne St. Univ. Sch. of Med., Detroit, MI, Amy Leber, PhD, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, Kristy Lindsey, MT (AMT), Microbiology, Baystate Health, Holyoke, MA, Kathleen Stellrecht, Ph.D., D(ABMM), HCLD (ABB), Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY, Rangaraj Selvarangan, PhD, Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, J Daly, PhD, Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, Paul D. Fey, PhD, Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, Per Gesteland, MD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, Aimie Faucett, M.S., BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT, Bradley Malin, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, Christine ‎ Ginocchio, PhD MT, bioMérieux, Durham, NC and Mark Poritz, PhD, Chemistry Research, BioFire Defense, Murray, UT

    Disclosures:

    L. Meyers, BioFire Diagnostics: Employee , Salary

    R. K. Nelson, BioFire Diagnostics: Employee , Salary

    F. Nolte, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    V. Donovan, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    J. Dien Bard, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    G. Storch, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    S. Spitzer, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    H. Salimnia, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    A. Leber, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    K. Lindsey, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    K. Stellrecht, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    R. Selvarangan, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    J. Daly, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    P. D. Fey, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    P. Gesteland, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    A. Faucett, BioFire Diagnostics: Employee , Salary

    B. Malin, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    C. Ginocchio, BioFire Diagnostics: Employee , Salary

    M. Poritz, BioFire Diagnostics: Collaborator , Consulting fee

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. CDT, Wednesday Oct. 26th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.