260. Are Antimicrobial Curtains as Clean as You Think?
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: Environment and Device Cleaning
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Background: There is growing evidence suggesting that textiles are associated with increased rates of healthcare associated infections. In an effort to decrease the risk of transmission of healthcare-associated pathogens, our institution transitioned from standard curtains to antimicrobial treated curtains. Environmental services determined that it was no longer necessary to clean or exchange curtains between patient use unless clearly soiled. Therefore, we aimed to determine the degree of bacterial contamination on antimicrobial curtains within our medical intensive care unit (ICU).

Methods: 20 curtains were sampled from 10 different patient rooms in our medical ICU; one adjacent to the entry glass door and one surrounding the commode. Curtain panels facing the patients were sampled with sterile rayon swabs which were immediately placed in tryptic soy broth and incubated for 48 hours. Tubes showing growth were then streaked to Columbia blood agar and MacConkey agar (ThermoFisher, Lenexa, KS) and incubated 24 hours prior to identification.

Results: We found that out of 20 curtains, 95% (n= 19) showed bacterial growth. Out of the 10 door curtains 50% (n= 5) showed Gram-negative bacilli and 100% (n= 10) had Gram-positive organisms. Out of the 10 commode curtains, 10% (n= 1) showed Gram-negative organisms and 90% (n= 9) had Gram-positive organisms (Table 1).

Conclusion: Antimicrobial curtains are contaminated with pathogenic organisms; therefore, they should be thoroughly disinfected, exchanged, or totally foregone in between patients. Furthermore, we believe that the use of antimicrobial curtains should not preclude the disinfection of these surfaces upon terminal cleaning.

Table1:

Room

Commode

Door

1

1+ CNS* #1

1+ M. luteus

1+ CNS #2

2+ CNS

2+ Bacillus spp

1+ Acinetobacter spp

2

4+ CNS

4+ CNS #1

4+ CNS #2

3

No Growth

4+ CNS #1

4+ CNS #2

4+ CNS #3

4+ Pantoea spp

4

4+ CNS

4+ CNS

5

4+ E. hirae

4+ CNS

4+ E. hirae

4+ CNS

6

3+ E. faecium

3+ Bacillus spp

4+ Streptococcus spp

4+ Pantoea spp

7

4+ Paenibacillus spp

4+ CNS

4+ Bacillus spp

4+ Pantoea spp

4+ Acinetobacter spp

4+ CNS

3+ Acinetobacter spp

8

4+ E. faecalis

2+ CNS

4+ CNS

9

4+ Bacillus spp

4+ E. faecalis

4+ CNS

4+ E. faecalis

2+ CNS

10

4+ CNS #1

4+ CNS #2

4+ CNS

4+Corynebacterium spp

2+ Pantoea spp

*CNS: Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus spp.

Shela Sridhar, MD1, Nathan Ledeboer, PhD, D(ABMM)2, Rahul Nanchal, MD3, Tami Mackey, MT(ASCP)4, Mary Beth Graham, MD, FIDSA1, April Vanderslik, RN, BSN, CIC5 and L. Silvia Munoz-Price, MD, PhD6, (1)Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Microbiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, (3)Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI, (4)Dynacare Laboratories, Milwaukee, WI, (5)Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI, (6)Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI

Disclosures:

S. Sridhar, None

N. Ledeboer, None

R. Nanchal, None

T. Mackey, None

M. B. Graham, None

A. Vanderslik, None

L. S. Munoz-Price, Xenex: Consultant and Speaker's Bureau , Consulting fee
Clorox: Consultant , Consulting fee
Ecolab: Speaker's Bureau , none

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