1287. Caregiver Impact of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalizations among US Preterm Infants 29–35 Weeks’ Gestational Age
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Clinical Infectious Diseases: Respiratory Infections
Friday, October 28, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • 123310_Pokrywinski IDWeek 2016-P_PSO_13Oct16.pdf (57.7 kB)
  • Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalizations in the US; however, there is limited understanding of how RSV hospitalizations (RSVH) impact caregivers, particularly of high-risk preterm infants.

    Methods: SENTINEL1 was an observational study of preterm infants 29–35 weeks’ gestational age hospitalized for confirmed RSV disease during the 2014–2015 RSV season (NCT02273882). Caregiver responses to stress and health measures, including an open-ended question about the impact of the RSVH, were collected at discharge, 1 wk, 2 wks, and 1 mo post discharge. Open-ended responses were grouped by impact theme for analysis.

    Results: Caregivers provided responses for 198 of 212 enrolled infants with community-acquired RSVH. Caregiver stress and perception of the infant’s stress and health were reported at each timepoint (Fig. 1A-B). Emotional impact (eg, stress, worry, fear), disruption of family routine (eg, travel for medical visits), medical concerns (eg, monitoring infant’s breathing), and financial concerns were the most frequently raised issues that persisted up to 1 mo post discharge (Table).

     

     

    Table.

     

    Proportion of Responses

     

    At Discharge

    (n=235)

    1 Wk Post Discharge (n=174)

    2 Wks Post Discharge (n=151)

    1 Mo Post Discharge

    (n=182)

    Enrolled Infants for Whom Caregivers Responded, n (%)

    183 (86)

    152 (72)

    133 (63)

    154 (73)

    Caregiver Type, %

     

     

     

     

    Mother

    75

    80

    79

    78

     

    Father

    21

    18

    18

    19

    Other

    4

    2

    3

    3

    Impact Theme*, %

     

     

     

     

    Emotional

    54

    48

    28

    33

    Routine Disruption/Separation from Other Children

    36

    25

    15

    20

    Medical Concerns

    13

    5

    7

    13

    Financial

    30

    12

    9

    12

    Family Relationship

    31

    16

    4

    3

    Sleep/Energy

    11

    11

    8

    3

    Coordinating Care

    14

    6

    3

    2

    Miscellaneous

    13

    5

    7

    13

    Infant Better/Back to Normal

    5

    15

    31

    19

    No Impact Reported

    9

    21

    26

    30

    *Caregiver responses could be grouped into multiple impact themes so the percentage at each timepoint will be >100%. More than one caregiver could provide responses for an infant.

    Conclusion: Although caregivers reported improvements in stress and health scores, stress-related impacts of the RSVH were high at discharge and remained prevalent up to one mo post discharge. RSVHs have a considerable impact on caregivers that should be included in evaluations of RSV disease burden in preterm infants.

    This study was sponsored by AstraZeneca.

    Robin M. Pokrzywinski, MHA1, Laura L. Swett, PhD1, Jumi Yi, MD2, Veena R. Kumar, MD, MPH3, Kimmie K. McLaurin, MS4 and Nancy K. Leidy, PhD5, (1)Department of Outcomes Research, Evidera, Bethesda, MD, (2)Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (3)Department of US Medical Affairs, AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, (4)Department of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, (5)Department of Scientific Affairs, Evidera, Bethesda, MD

    Disclosures:

    R. M. Pokrzywinski, Evidera: Employee , Salary

    L. L. Swett, Evidera: Employee , Salary

    J. Yi, None

    V. R. Kumar, AstraZeneca: Employee , Salary and Stock

    K. K. McLaurin, AstraZeneca: Employee , employee granted stock and Salary

    N. K. Leidy, Evidera: Employee , Salary

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. CDT, Wednesday Oct. 26th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.