759. Impact of Universal Immunization Policy on Childhood Influenza Vaccination Rates in Children With and Without High-Risk Conditions in the United Kingdom
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Vaccines: Pediatric
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Background: The United Kingdom’s (UK) influenza immunization program was extended to all 2–3-year-olds in 2013–2014, all 2–4-year-olds in 2014–2015, and all 2–6-year-olds in 2015–2016. This study examined the effect of universal immunization policy on vaccination rates in children with and without high-risk conditions for developing influenza-related complications.

Methods: All children aged 2–17 years on September 1 of each season (2012–2015) with ≥12 months’ medical history in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink were included in this analysis. Information on administration of influenza vaccine was retrieved from records between September 1 and February 28 of each season. High-risk conditions were identified using definitions adapted from PRIMIS specifications (University of Nottingham, UK).

Results: In total, 794,138 (2012–2013 season), 735,136 (2013–2014), 660,216 (2014–2015), and 545,966 (2015–2016) children meeting the study selection criteria were identified. Vaccination rates by season, for children with and without any high-risk condition, are summarized in the Table.

Table: Vaccination rate (in %) by age category and season in children with and without any high-risk condition

Age (years)

Any high-risk condition

Without high-risk condition

Season

Season

2012–2013
(n=53,475)

2013–2014
(n=48,254)

2014–2015
(n=41,940)

2015–2016
(n=33,876)

2012–2013
(n=740,663)

2013–2014
(n=686,882)

2014–2015
(n=618,276)

2015–2016
(n=512,090)

2

38.6

60.9

57.4

53.0

0.9

45.2

41.1

40.6

3

42.1

61.2

56.8

54.7

1.1

40.8

42.5

40.2

4

40.4

45.4

51.1

47.5

1.2

4.2

31.3

33.0

5

41.7

45.3

43.5

46.9

1.1

4.4

8.3

30.6

6

41.2

47.0

42.6

45.2

1.0

4.4

8.1

29.4

7–11

41.5

45.1

43.5

38.1

1.1

5.8

8.7

7.8

12–17

40.5

41.2

41.4

37.8

1.4

1.5

2.2

1.5

Conclusion: Vaccination rates sharply increased from 2014–2015 to 2015–2016 in 5- and 6-year-olds without high-risk conditions who were targeted by the extension of the immunization program, and to a lesser extent in these age cohorts with high-risk conditions. Vaccinations rates in other age cohorts remained stable or decreased slightly in 3- and 4-year-olds without high-risk conditions. Results emphasize that influenza vaccination rates, for children with and without high-risk conditions, can be increased under a universal immunization policy. The direct and indirect benefits of this approach are being evaluated as part of further research.

Study sponsored by AstraZeneca.

Herve Caspard, MD, ScD1, Amy Steffey, DVM, MPH1, Betina Blak, PhD2 and Sankarasubramanian Rajaram, MD, MBA2, (1)MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD, (2)AstraZeneca, Luton, United Kingdom

Disclosures:

H. Caspard, MedImmune: Employee , Salary

A. Steffey, MedImmune: Consultant , Consulting fee

B. Blak, AstraZeneca: Employee , Salary

S. Rajaram, AstraZeneca: Employee , Salary

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