148. Microalbuminuria in a Perinatally HIV-1 Infected Cohort
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Big Viruses in Little People (Pediatric Viral Diseases)
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Background: Renal disorders are among the ten most common noninfectious complications occurring in perinatally HIV-1 infected children. In a study performed in 2007 we demonstrated for a perinatally HIV-1 infected population a 10% frequency of abnormal renal findings. The objective of the current study is to determine for the interval 2008 to 2015 the frequency of renal disorders in a cohort of perinatally HIV-1 infected individuals and test for relationships of renal affection with laboratory and clinical outcomes.

Methods: Record review of perinatally-infected HIV in an urban pediatric HIV clinic. Data were obtained from patient records.

Results: 69 patients who had microalbumin/creatinine ratio (MC) determined between 2008 and 2015 and for whom viral load (VL), CD4%, CD8 %,CD8+CD38+ %, CD8+HLA-DR+ and complete demographic data were available were included. 13 patients (18%) met preset definitions for microalbuminuria (>2 findings of MC >30 mg/g, separated by at least 1 month). Selected outcomes for the microalbuminuria group (13 patients) were compared to those of the 56 patients who did not meet the definition of microalbuminuria.

Table 1. Demographics and Selected Laboratory Findings

Non-microalbuminuria

Microalbuminuria

P value

Number of patients, n (%)

56 (81)

13( 19)

Age, median (IQR) years

11.7 (6.8)

12.3 (9.62)

NS

Gender(% female)

50

84

<0.01

Ethnicity (%) Black

71

69

NS

Hispanic

19

30

NS

MC, mg/g

5

51

<0.01

VL copies per ml, median

180

110

NS

CD4 %, median

32

32

NS

CD8 %, median

41

43

NS

CD8CD38 %, median

12

22

<0.01

CD8DR %, median

7

15

<0.01

NS : Not significant

Conclusion:

Approximately 19% of a small cohort of perinatally HIV-1 infected children was found to have microalbuminuria.

The microalbuminuria group exhibits marked activation of CD8+ but is not associated with the most common measures of HIV clinical status, CD4 % and VL. In spite of the current patient population having higher CD4 % and lower VL than our past population we found an ~10% increase in frequency of abnormal renal findings as compared to ~10 years ago.

Roukaya Al Hammoud, MD1, Norma Perez, DO2, Gilhen Rodriguez, MD2, Laura Benjamins, MD3, Gabriella Del Bianco, MD4, James R. Murphy, PhD2 and Gloria P. Heresi, MD2, (1)Pediatric Infectious Diseases, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, (2)Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX, (3)Adolescent Medicine, University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX, (4)University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX

Disclosures:

R. Al Hammoud, None

N. Perez, None

G. Rodriguez, None

L. Benjamins, None

G. Del Bianco, None

J. R. Murphy, None

G. P. Heresi, None

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