383. Trends in HAI Etiologic Organisms at a Pediatric Medical Center – 2004-2015
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: Pediatrics
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Room: Poster Hall
Posters
  • Schaffzin ID Week 2016 FINAL 10-17-16.pdf (859.5 kB)
  • Background: Understanding the epidemiology of etiologic organisms that cause healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) is important for treatment and prevention strategies. Our institution has implemented multiple prevention strategies to reduce HAIs. We explored the effect of these activities on the organisms identified in our HAIs from 2004 to 2015.

    Methods: HAIs were defined according to national standard definitions at the time of infection. Organisms isolated from infections were identified in our local infection control database. Annual rates were calculated by organism for all HAIs. Poisson regression analysis was used to assess trends in the ten most frequently identified organisms. We analyzed organism predominance by year as well as in three 4-year periods to compare proportions of HAI by organism.

    Results: Over the 12 year period, each of the most frequent 9 organisms showed a significant downward trend in incident-rate with near preservation of rank. When compared by 4-year periods, we found a significant increase in the proportion of S aureusisolates (15.8% to 24.8%, p<0.01) with a concomitant decrease in coagulase negative staphylococcus (CoNS) isolates (20.9% to 12.3%, p<0.01). All other organisms showed no significant change in proportion.

    Conclusion: When analyzed over a 12 year period, our HAI rates decreased overall, but the proportion of identified organisms did not change. When stratifying into three 4-year groups, the overall rate of staphylococci remained the same, but S aureusappeared to replace CoNS by approximately 10%. Measures to prevent HAIs in our institution have had little impact on relative proportion of etiologic organisms.

    Proportion (%)

    Organism

    2004-2007

    2008-2011

    2012-2015

    p value

    S. aureus

    15.8

    21.4

    24.8

    <0.01*

    CoNS

    20.9

    8.8

    12.3

    <0.01*

    Enterococcus spp.

    10.5

    10.8

    12.0

    0.64

    P aeruginosa

    10.7

    11.3

    10.8

    0.93

    Klebsiella spp.

    8.6

    10.2

    9.7

    0.53

    Enterobacter spp.

    6.9

    8.5

    6.6

    0.37

    E coli

    6.0

    7.7

    8.1

    0.23

    Candida spp

    7.5

    7.2

    5.5

    0.29

    Strep viridans group

    5.6

    3.6

    3.5

    0.07

    S marcescens

    2.1

    3.8

    3.0

    0.16

    Joshua Schaffzin, MD, PhD, Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, Andrea Ankrum, MS, MT, MP(ASCP), CIC, Infection Control Program, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, Matthew Washam, MD, MPH, Infectious Disease, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH and Beverly Connelly, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA, Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

    Disclosures:

    J. Schaffzin, None

    A. Ankrum, None

    M. Washam, None

    B. Connelly, None

    See more of: HAI: Pediatrics
    See more of: Poster Abstract Session

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. CDT, Wednesday Oct. 26th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.