1932. Risk Factors for Mortality in Patients with Aeromonas Bacteremia
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Clinical: Bacteremia and Endocarditis
Saturday, October 7, 2017
Room: Poster Hall CD
Background:

Aeromonas species is an increasing pathogen of bacteremia, especially in the setting of healthcare-associated infection. We investigated the risk factors for mortality in patients with Aeromonas bacteremia.


Methods:

The electronic medical records of all patients with Aeromonas bacteremia between January 2006 and December 2015 at a 2000-bed tertiary care center in Seoul, Korea, were retrospectively reviewed. The analysis was performed to identify factors associated with 28-day mortality.

Results: A total of 138 patients with Aeromonas bacteremia were enrolled for this study. Most common pathogen was A. hydrophila (n=58, 42%), followed by A. caviae (n=50, 36.2%) and A. veronii biovar sorbia (n=19, 13.8%). 93 (67.4%) patients were male and the median age was 64.5 years. The most common source of Aeromonas bacteremia was biliary tract in 74 (53.6%), followed by peritoneum in 10 (7.2%), skin and soft tissue in 5 (3.6%), and liver abscess in 4 (2.9). Primary bacteremia with unknown origin was in 39 (28.3%). The overall all-cause 28-day mortality rate was 29%. On univariate analysis, skin and soft tissue infection (P=0.025), peritonitis (P=0.035), healthcare-associated infection (P=0.029), Charlson comorbidity score (P<0.001) and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (P<0.001) were significantly related to the mortality. On multivariate analysis, skin and soft tissue infection (odds ratio (OR) 32.535, 95% confidential interval (CI) 2.151-492.203, P=0.012), Charlson comorbidity score (OR 1.409, 95% CI 1.101-1.804, P=0.007) and SOFA score (OR 1.472, 95% CI 1.253-1.729, P<0.001) were independent risk factors associated with mortality.


Conclusion:

In our study, Aeromonas bacteremia was associated with high mortality rate. Skin and soft tissue infection, Charlson comorbidity score and SOFA score were independent risk factors for mortality in patients with Aeromonas bacteremia.

Heun Choi, MD1, Jung Ju Kim, MD2, Jinnam Kim, MD3, Hye Seong, MD2, Se Ju Lee, MD2, Wooyong Jeong, MD4, In Young Jeong, MD4, Su Jin Jeong, MD/PhD4, Nam Su Ku, MD, PhD4, Sang Hoon Han, MD4, Jun Yong Choi, MD, PhD4, Young Goo Song, MD, PhD5 and June Myung Kim, MD, PhD4, (1)Department of Internal Medicine and AIDS Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South), (2)Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South), (3)Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South), (4)Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South), (5)AIDS Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South)

Disclosures:

H. Choi, None

J. J. Kim, None

J. Kim, None

H. Seong, None

S. J. Lee, None

W. Jeong, None

I. Y. Jeong, None

S. J. Jeong, None

N. S. Ku, None

S. H. Han, None

J. Y. Choi, None

Y. G. Song, None

J. M. Kim, None

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