144. Public Health Response to U.S. Cases of Candida auris, a Globally-Emerging, Multidrug-Resistant Yeast, 2013–2017
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Candida Auris: Coming Soon to a Patient Near You
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Room: Poster Hall CD

Public health response to U.S. cases of Candida auris, a globally-emerging, multidrug-resistant yeast, 2013–2017

Background: Candida auris is an often multidrug-resistant yeast that causes invasive infections and, unlike most Candida species, spreads in healthcare facilities. CDC released a clinical alert in June 2016 requesting reporting of C. auris cases. We investigated cases to contain transmission and inform prevention measures for this novel organism.

Methods: Clinical cases were defined as C. auris from any clinical specimen from a patient in the United States. Response to cases included implementation of infection control measures, enhanced cleaning and disinfection, and testing of close contacts for C. auris colonization (isolation from a person’s axilla or groin was defined as a screening case). Microbiology records were reviewed at reporting facilities for missed cases. All isolates were forwarded to CDC for confirmation, antifungal susceptibility testing, and whole-genome sequencing (WGS).

Results: As of April 13, 2017, 61 clinical cases of C. auris were reported from six states: New York (39), New Jersey (15), Illinois (4), Indiana (1), Maryland (1), and Massachusetts (1). All but two occurred since 2016 (figure). An additional 32 screening cases were identified among contacts. Median age of clinical case-patients was 70 years (range 21–96); 56% were male. Nearly all had underlying medical conditions and extensive exposure to healthcare facilities before infection. Most clinical isolates were from blood (38, 62%), followed by urine (8, 13%) and respiratory tract (5, 8%). Among the first 35 isolates, 30 (86%) were resistant to fluconazole, 15 (43%) to amphotericin B, and one (3%) to caspofungin. No isolate was resistant to all three. WGS revealed isolates from each state were highly related and different from other states, suggestive of transmission. Microbiology record reviews did not identify additional cases before 2016.

Conclusion: C. auris is an emerging pathogen, with similarities to multidrug-resistant bacteria, that has been transmitted in U.S. healthcare settings. CDC and public health partners are committed to prompt and aggressive action through investigation of cases and heightened infection control practices to halt its spread. 

Sharon Tsay, MD1,2, Rory M. Welsh, PhD1, Eleanor H. Adams, MD, MPH3, Nancy A. Chow, PhD1, Lalitha Gade, M.Pharm1, Elizabeth L. Berkow, PhD4, Emily Lutterloh, MD, MPH5, Monica Quinn, RN, MS6, Sudha Chaturvedi, PhD7, Rafael Fernandez, MPH8, Rosalie Giardina, BS9, Jane Greenko, RN, MPH, CIC10, Karen Southwick, MD9, Janna L. Kerins, VMD, MPH2,11, Stephanie Black, MD, MSc11, Sarah K. Kemble, MD11, Patricia M. Barrett, MSD12, Rebecca Greeley, MPH12, Kerri Barton, MPH13, Dj Shannon, MPH14, Alexander Kallen, MD, MPH15, Alicia Shugart, MA15, Anastasia P. Litvintseva, PhD1, Shawn Lockhart, PhD1, Tom Chiller, MD, MPH1, Brendan R. Jackson, MD, MPH1 and Snigdha Vallabhaneni, MD, MPH1, (1)Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (2)Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (3)Healthcare Epidemiology & Infection Control, New York State Department of Health, New Rochelle, NY, (4)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (5)Bureau of Healthcare Associated Infections, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, (6)Health Care Epidemiology and Infection Control, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, (7)Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, (8)Healthcare Epidemiology & Infection Control, New York State Department of Health, New York, NY, (9)New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, (10)Healthcare Epidemiology & Infection Control, New York State Department of Health, Central Islip, NY, (11)Chicago Department of Public Health, Chicago, IL, (12)New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, (13)Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Jamaica Plain, MA, (14)Indiana State Department of Health, Indianapolis, IN, (15)Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Disclosures:

S. Tsay, None

R. M. Welsh, None

E. H. Adams, None

N. A. Chow, None

L. Gade, None

E. L. Berkow, None

E. Lutterloh, None

M. Quinn, None

S. Chaturvedi, None

R. Fernandez, None

R. Giardina, None

J. Greenko, None

K. Southwick, None

J. L. Kerins, None

S. Black, None

S. K. Kemble, None

P. M. Barrett, None

R. Greeley, None

K. Barton, None

D. Shannon, None

A. Kallen, None

A. Shugart, None

A. P. Litvintseva, None

S. Lockhart, None

T. Chiller, None

B. R. Jackson, None

S. Vallabhaneni, None

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