475. Surveillance of hemodialysis events: A prospective multicenter study, first report from Turkey
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: Surveillance + Reporting
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Room: Poster Hall CD
Posters
  • poster-TRHIES.pdf (511.5 kB)
  • Surveillance of hemodialysis events: A prospective multicenter study, first report from Turkey

    Background: With the increasing numbers of hemodialysis (HD) patients, HD related infections are becoming common. However, there is neither a surveillance system nor a study to reveal the HD related infection rates in Turkey. We aimed to investigate the infection rate among HD outpatients and current status in our country.

    Methods: A multicenter prospective surveillance system is performed to investigate the infection incidence among HD patients. We implemented a central database for data collection with a web interface compatible with mobile devices. CDC National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) dialysis event (DE) protocol is adopted for definitions and reporting. Dialysis event rates are calculated for each vascular access type and given as per 100 patient months.

    Results: During April 2016 – April 2017, 9 centers reported data to the system. A total of 145 DEs reported in 5718 patient-months, and the overall DE rate was 2.53 per 100 patient-months during the surveillance period. Data for each event type and vascular access type are given in Figure 1. Most frequently isolated microorganisms from blood cultures are given in Table 1. DEs were significantly more common in patients with catheters compared to patients with fistulas (p<0.0001). DE rate was significantly lower in patients educated about the care of their vascular access site (p<0.0001). Outcomes of DEs were hospitalization (84%), loss of vascular access (17%), and death (8%).

    Conclusion: This first surveillance study on DE in Turkey revealed the current status of DE in HD patients, and will guide to generate a national surveillance system for raising the awareness on the issue and maintaining much lower DE rates.

    Figure 1.

    Table 1: Isolated microorganisms

    Microorganism

    Fistula

    Catheter

    Total, n (%)

    Staphylococcus coagulase-negative

    3

    7

    10 (27)

    Staphylococcus aureus

    2

    5

    7 (18.9)

    Escherichia coli

    1

    5

    6 (16.2)

    Klebsiella pneumonia

    1

    3

    4 (10.8)

    Enterobacter spp

    1

    2

    3 (8.1)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    0

    3

    3 (8.1)

    Enterococcus faecalis

    0

    2

    2 (5.4)

    Candida spp

    0

    1

    1 (2.7)

    Enterococcus faecium

    1

    0

    1 (2.7)

    Total

    9

    28

    37 (100)

    Imran Hasanoglu, MD, PhD1, Rahmet Guner, Prof. Dr.1, H. Veli Atalay, MD. PhD2, Suzan Sahin, MD. PhD3, Ergun Parmaksiz, MD. PhD4, Fatma Yilmaz Karadag, MD. PhD5, Sabahat Alışır Ecder, Assoc Prof.6, Tugba Arslan Gulen, MD. PhD.7, Zuhal Atan Ucar, MD. PhD8, Oguz Karabay, Prof. Dr.9, Savas Sipahi, Assoc. Prof.10, Derya Yapar, MD. PhD.11, Ibrahim Dogan, MD. PhD.12, Irfan Baran, MD. PhD.13, Esra Kaya Kilic, MD. PhD.14, Murat Duranay, Assoc. Prof.15, Gulden Ersoz, Prof. Dr.16, Gulcan Turkmen, MD17 and A. Alper Kiykim, Prof. Dr.18, (1)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Yildirim Beyazit University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, (2)Nephrology, Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, (3)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, (4)Nephrology, Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, (5)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microlobiology, Medeniyet University, Istanbul, Turkey, (6)Nephrology, Medeniyet University, Istanbul, Turkey, (7)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microlobiology, Omer Halisdemir University School of Medicine, Nigde, Turkey, (8)Nephrology, Nigde State Hospital, Nigde, Turkey, (9)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Sakarya University School of Medicine, Sakarya, Turkey, (10)Nephrology, Sakarya University School of Medicine, Sakarya, Turkey, (11)Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Hitit University Medical School, Corum, Turkey, (12)Nephrology, Hitit University Medical School, Corum, Turkey, (13)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Van Yuzuncuyil University School of Medicine, Van, Turkey, (14)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, (15)Nephrology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, (16)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Mersin University School of Medicine, Mersin, Turkey, (17)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey, (18)Nephrology, Mersin University School of Medicine, Mersin, Turkey

    Disclosures:

    I. Hasanoglu, None

    R. Guner, None

    H. V. Atalay, None

    S. Sahin, None

    E. Parmaksiz, None

    F. Yilmaz Karadag, None

    S. Alışır Ecder, None

    T. Arslan Gulen, None

    Z. Atan Ucar, None

    O. Karabay, None

    S. Sipahi, None

    D. Yapar, None

    I. Dogan, None

    I. Baran, None

    E. Kaya Kilic, None

    M. Duranay, None

    G. Ersoz, None

    G. Turkmen, None

    A. A. Kiykim, None

    Findings in the abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m. PDT, Wednesday Oct. 4th with the exception of research findings presented at the IDWeek press conferences.