415. The Investigation of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Colonization in Geriatric Population in A Turkish Nursing Home
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI Non-Acute Care
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Room: Poster Hall CD
Posters
  • IDSA 3-8 Oct 2017 Dr V. Avkan Oguz nursing home poster.pdf (3.4 MB)
  • The Investigation of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Colonization in Geriatric Population in a Nursing Home

    Background: Nursing homes act as a reservoir for Multi drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of nasal axillary and rectal colonization of MDR bacteria and risk factors for the colonization in elderly people living in a nursing home.

    Methods: This is a cross-sectional prospective study. Residents (> 65 years) signed the consent form were included. Demographical data and accessible risk factors of the residents were recorded. Also instrumental activity daily scale and activities of daily living scale forms of the residents were used. Nasal and axillary swabs were examined for Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and rectal swabs were examined for Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE), Extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing Enterobacteriaceae(ESBL-E) and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae colonization.

    Results: 247 axillary, 246 nasal and 245 rectal swabs from 247 residents were obtained. Median age was 85 ± 6.7 years and 190 (77%) of residents were female. The swab samples taken from 75 (30%) residents were isolated as S. aureus, 8 (3.2%) of them were MRSA. Perianal carriage for VRE (E. faecium MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) was found in 10 (4.1%) residents. ESBL-producing bacteria were isolated from 17 (6.9%) of the residents (14 Escherichia coli and 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae). In only one resident (0.4%) carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae was detected. Colonization with multiple MDR bacteria was found in 3 (1.2%) residents. The risk factors are defined in Table 1.

    Conclusion: In the study, colonization with MDR bacteria rate was 32 (12.9%) and colonization rate increases as the activity of daily living scale increase (p=0.004). Therefore, risk factors should be considered and surveillance analysis should be done to manage infections caused by MDR bacteria in nursing homes.

    Table 1. Presence of risk factors for MDR bacteria

    Risk factors

    Colonized (n=32)

    Noncolonized

    (n=215)

    P

    Antibiotic use

    9(28.1)

    23 (10.8)

    0.006

    Skin lesions

    2(6.3)

    6(2.8)

    0.619

    Hospitalization in last 3 months

    3 (9.4)

    8(3.8)

    0.323

    Malignancy

    5(15.6)

    11(5.2)

    0.024

    Dementia

    25 (78.1)

    134 (62.9)

    0.082

    Ýmmobility

    19(59.4)

    65(30.5)

    0.001

    Enteral support

    10(31.2)

    22(10.3)

    0.0009

    PEG

    3(9.4)

    4(1.9)

    0.06

    Oya Özlem Eren-Kutsoylu, MD, Instuctor1, Vildan Avkan-Oguz, Prof, MD2, Madina Abdullayeva, MD3, Nil Tekin, MD, Assoc Prof4 and Nur Yapar, MD, Prof1, (1)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of medicine, Izmir, Turkey, (2)Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey, (3)Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of medicine, Izmir, Turkey, (4)Public Health, Narlidere Geriatric Care Center and Residential Home, Izmir, Turkey

    Disclosures:

    O. Ö. Eren-Kutsoylu, None

    V. Avkan-Oguz, None

    M. Abdullayeva, None

    N. Tekin, None

    N. Yapar, None

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