498. Does pulsed-xenon ultraviolet disinfection add additional value to manual cleaning?
Session: Poster Abstract Session: HAI: The Environment
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Room: Poster Hall CD
Posters
  • Does pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection add additional value to manual cleaning.pdf (1.2 MB)
  • Background: Novel disinfection tools have been used to supplement standard hospital cleaning protocols. This study was conducted to determine if the addition of Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet disinfection (PX-UV) increased the effectiveness of manual cleaning with four different environmental cleaning and disinfecting agents and how their performance compared to the industry standard of sodium hypochlorite 10%.

    Methods: Research staff collected 600 pre-clean, post-clean, and post-clean + PX-UV environmental samples of aerobic bacterial colonies (ABC) and MRSA from five high touch surfaces (bedrail, call button, toilet seat, bathroom grab rail, tray table). The PX-UV device was used three times - one five minute cycle on each side of the patient bed and one five minute cycle in the restroom.

    Results: Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed post-clean ABC counts were significantly different from post-clean + PX-UV clean counts for soap and water (p<0.001), quaternary ammonium compound (p<0.001), and hydrogen peroxide (p<0.001), but not for sodium hypochlorite 10% (p=0.78). A negative binomial mixed regression model  showed that post-clean + PX-UV ABC counts for Soap and water  were 8.6 times higher than post-clean ABC counts for sodium hypochlorite 10% solution, holding all other factors constant, p=0.001. Post-clean ABC counts for QAC + UV were 6 times higher than post-clean ABC counts for sodium hypochlorite 10% solution, holding all other factors constant, p=0.004. A Kruskal-Wallis test indicated there was no statistically significant difference in MRSA counts between cleaning chemicals at post-clean (p=0.1563) or post-clean + UV (p=0.337), indicating that the cleaning chemicals performed equally well at each stage. UV further statistically significantly lowered MRSA counts beyond the post-clean level only for the quaternary ammonium compound group (p=0.0073).

    Conclusion: The addition of PX-UV significantly improves disinfection for soap and water, hydrogen peroxide, and quaternary ammonium compound, but not for sodium hypochlorite 10%. This improvement does not bring microbial levels to those seen when using sodium hypochlorite 10% alone.

    John Coppin, MPH1, Chetan Jinadatha, MD, MPH2,3, Frank Villamaria, MPH1, Marjory Williams, PhD4, Laurel Copeland, PhD5 and John Zeber, PhD5, (1)Research, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System, Temple, TX, (2)Infectious Disease Division, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, TX, (3)Department of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, (4)Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System, Temple, TX, (5)Center for Applied Health Research, Temple, TX

    Disclosures:

    J. Coppin, None

    C. Jinadatha, Xenex Healthcare Services: CRADA , Research support

    F. Villamaria, None

    M. Williams, None

    L. Copeland, None

    J. Zeber, None

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