303. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients naïve septic arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Session: Poster Abstract Session: Bone and Joint Infections
Thursday, October 4, 2018
Room: S Poster Hall
Posters
  • Septic arthritis by SA_2018 IDWEEK.pdf (433.2 kB)
  • Background:

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with naïve septic arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Methods:

    We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients with naïve septic arthritis at three tertiary-care hospitals from 2005 through 2017.

    Results:

    Of the 101 patients with S. aureus naïve septic arthritis, 39 (38.6%) was identified MRSA. Compared to patients with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), patients with MRSA presented more frequently with nosocomial infection (1.6% vs. 17.9%; p=0.005), and inappropriate antibiotics within 48h (0% vs. 74.4%; p<0.001). The overall 30-day mortality was 4% and tended to be higher in MRSA group (1.6% vs. 7.7%; p=0.296). The treatment failure was 23.8%, which was higher in MRSA group (35.9% vs. 16.1%; p=0.031). The independent risk factors for treatment failure were end-stage of renal disease with hemodialysis (odds ratio [OR] = 32.073; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.669-385.372; p=0.006) and antibiotics duration less than 6 weeks (OR = 4.987; 95% CI: 1.204-20.662; p=0.027)

    Conclusion:

    MRSA septic arthritis was associated with more frequent nosocomial infection and delayed treatment compared to MSSA septic arthritis. Antibiotic therapy, for less than 6 weeks, may be cautioned for S aureus septic arthritis until better outcomes are assured.

    Jungok Kim, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases, Chungnam National University of School of Medicine, Deajoen, Korea, Republic of (South), Eun-Jeong Joo, MD, PhD, Division of Infectious Diseases, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South) and So Yeon Park, MD, PhD, Infectious Diseases, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital Hallym University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South)

    Disclosures:

    J. Kim, None

    E. J. Joo, None

    S. Y. Park, None

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